A case study on corrosion of stainless steel in firewater mains

Leena Carpén, Thomas Ohligschläger

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference article in proceedingsScientificpeer-review

    Abstract

    Traditionally, many firewater mains were made of carbon steel or cast iron. At present, more and more stainless steel is used as material for firewater pipes due to usually better corrosion resistance in natural waters than iron or carbon steel. In some few cases, however, unexpected corrosion failures in systems using austenitic stainless steels were observed only after a relatively short time of usage ranging from a few weeks to a few years. Most of these corrosion damages were found on the weld nuggets or in the heat-affected zones of on-site girth welds. One of the most important factors affecting the corrosion resistance of stainless steel at welds and in heataffected zones are the surface oxide films originating from the welding heat in the presence of oxygen (heat tints). Therefore, proper root shielding is important especially when welding pipes for fire protection systems where the water is taken from natural sources (e.g. from rivers, lakes or tap water), as microbially induced corrosion (MIC) can increase the risk for corrosion damages significantly. Two failure cases in fire protection systems, one in a stainless steel factory and one in a power plant have been studied and are described in this paper. A proposal for the mechanism is suggested and general recommendations how to avoid or diminish the risk for unexpected localised corrosion failures are given.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publication6th European stainless steel conference
    Subtitle of host publicationScience and market
    PublisherJernkontoret
    Pages129-136
    ISBN (Print)9789197413190
    Publication statusPublished - 2008
    MoE publication typeA4 Article in a conference publication
    Event6th European stainless steel conference: Science and market - Helsinki, Finland
    Duration: 10 Jun 200813 Jun 2008

    Conference

    Conference6th European stainless steel conference
    CountryFinland
    CityHelsinki
    Period10/06/0813/06/08

    Fingerprint

    Stainless steel
    Corrosion
    Welds
    Fire protection
    Carbon steel
    Corrosion resistance
    Welding
    Pipe
    Water
    Heat affected zone
    Austenitic stainless steel
    Cast iron
    Shielding
    Oxide films
    Lakes
    Industrial plants
    Power plants
    Rivers
    Iron
    Oxygen

    Cite this

    Carpén, L., & Ohligschläger, T. (2008). A case study on corrosion of stainless steel in firewater mains. In 6th European stainless steel conference: Science and market (pp. 129-136). Jernkontoret.
    Carpén, Leena ; Ohligschläger, Thomas. / A case study on corrosion of stainless steel in firewater mains. 6th European stainless steel conference: Science and market. Jernkontoret, 2008. pp. 129-136
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    title = "A case study on corrosion of stainless steel in firewater mains",
    abstract = "Traditionally, many firewater mains were made of carbon steel or cast iron. At present, more and more stainless steel is used as material for firewater pipes due to usually better corrosion resistance in natural waters than iron or carbon steel. In some few cases, however, unexpected corrosion failures in systems using austenitic stainless steels were observed only after a relatively short time of usage ranging from a few weeks to a few years. Most of these corrosion damages were found on the weld nuggets or in the heat-affected zones of on-site girth welds. One of the most important factors affecting the corrosion resistance of stainless steel at welds and in heataffected zones are the surface oxide films originating from the welding heat in the presence of oxygen (heat tints). Therefore, proper root shielding is important especially when welding pipes for fire protection systems where the water is taken from natural sources (e.g. from rivers, lakes or tap water), as microbially induced corrosion (MIC) can increase the risk for corrosion damages significantly. Two failure cases in fire protection systems, one in a stainless steel factory and one in a power plant have been studied and are described in this paper. A proposal for the mechanism is suggested and general recommendations how to avoid or diminish the risk for unexpected localised corrosion failures are given.",
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    Carpén, L & Ohligschläger, T 2008, A case study on corrosion of stainless steel in firewater mains. in 6th European stainless steel conference: Science and market. Jernkontoret, pp. 129-136, 6th European stainless steel conference, Helsinki, Finland, 10/06/08.

    A case study on corrosion of stainless steel in firewater mains. / Carpén, Leena; Ohligschläger, Thomas.

    6th European stainless steel conference: Science and market. Jernkontoret, 2008. p. 129-136.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference article in proceedingsScientificpeer-review

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    T1 - A case study on corrosion of stainless steel in firewater mains

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    AU - Ohligschläger, Thomas

    N1 - CA2: tk202 Project code: 10687

    PY - 2008

    Y1 - 2008

    N2 - Traditionally, many firewater mains were made of carbon steel or cast iron. At present, more and more stainless steel is used as material for firewater pipes due to usually better corrosion resistance in natural waters than iron or carbon steel. In some few cases, however, unexpected corrosion failures in systems using austenitic stainless steels were observed only after a relatively short time of usage ranging from a few weeks to a few years. Most of these corrosion damages were found on the weld nuggets or in the heat-affected zones of on-site girth welds. One of the most important factors affecting the corrosion resistance of stainless steel at welds and in heataffected zones are the surface oxide films originating from the welding heat in the presence of oxygen (heat tints). Therefore, proper root shielding is important especially when welding pipes for fire protection systems where the water is taken from natural sources (e.g. from rivers, lakes or tap water), as microbially induced corrosion (MIC) can increase the risk for corrosion damages significantly. Two failure cases in fire protection systems, one in a stainless steel factory and one in a power plant have been studied and are described in this paper. A proposal for the mechanism is suggested and general recommendations how to avoid or diminish the risk for unexpected localised corrosion failures are given.

    AB - Traditionally, many firewater mains were made of carbon steel or cast iron. At present, more and more stainless steel is used as material for firewater pipes due to usually better corrosion resistance in natural waters than iron or carbon steel. In some few cases, however, unexpected corrosion failures in systems using austenitic stainless steels were observed only after a relatively short time of usage ranging from a few weeks to a few years. Most of these corrosion damages were found on the weld nuggets or in the heat-affected zones of on-site girth welds. One of the most important factors affecting the corrosion resistance of stainless steel at welds and in heataffected zones are the surface oxide films originating from the welding heat in the presence of oxygen (heat tints). Therefore, proper root shielding is important especially when welding pipes for fire protection systems where the water is taken from natural sources (e.g. from rivers, lakes or tap water), as microbially induced corrosion (MIC) can increase the risk for corrosion damages significantly. Two failure cases in fire protection systems, one in a stainless steel factory and one in a power plant have been studied and are described in this paper. A proposal for the mechanism is suggested and general recommendations how to avoid or diminish the risk for unexpected localised corrosion failures are given.

    M3 - Conference article in proceedings

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    Carpén L, Ohligschläger T. A case study on corrosion of stainless steel in firewater mains. In 6th European stainless steel conference: Science and market. Jernkontoret. 2008. p. 129-136