A Graph Theory Approach to Functional Failure Propagation in Early Complex Cyber-Physical Systems (CCPSs)

Bryan M. O'Halloran, Nikolaos Papakonstantinou, Kristin Giammarco, Douglas L. Van Bossuyt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

This paper presents a framework to quantify failure propagation potential for complex, cyber-physical systems (CCPSs) during the conceptual stages of design. This method is referred to as the Function Failure Propagation Potential Methodology (FFPPM). This research is motivated by recent trends in engineering design. As systems become increasingly connected, an open area of research for CCPSs is to move reliability and failure assessments earlier in the engineering design process. This allows practitioners to make decisions at a point in the design process where the decision has a high impact and a low cost. Standard methods are limited by the availability of data and often rely on detailed representations of the system. As such, they have not addressed failure propagation in the functional design prior to selecting candidate architectures. To develop the metrics, graph theory is used to model and quantify the connectedness of the functional block diagram (FBD). These metrics quantify (1) the summation of the reachability matrix and (2) the summation of the number of paths between nodes (functions within system models) i and j for all i and j. From a practical standpoint, these metrics quantify the reachability between functions in the graph and the number of paths between functions defines the failure propagation potential of that failure. The unique contribution of this research is to quantify failure propagation potential during conceptual design prior to selecting candidate architectures. The goal of these metrics is to produce derived system requirements, based on an analysis, that focus on minimizing the impact of failures.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1734-1748
JournalINCOSE International Symposium
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed
EventINCOSE 2017 - Adelaide, Australia
Duration: 15 Jul 201720 Jul 2017

Fingerprint

Graph theory
Conceptual design
Cyber Physical System
Availability
Costs

Cite this

O'Halloran, Bryan M. ; Papakonstantinou, Nikolaos ; Giammarco, Kristin ; Bossuyt, Douglas L. Van. / A Graph Theory Approach to Functional Failure Propagation in Early Complex Cyber-Physical Systems (CCPSs). In: INCOSE International Symposium. 2017 ; Vol. 27, No. 1. pp. 1734-1748.
@article{65f83834a5974e909e30763759571040,
title = "A Graph Theory Approach to Functional Failure Propagation in Early Complex Cyber-Physical Systems (CCPSs)",
abstract = "This paper presents a framework to quantify failure propagation potential for complex, cyber-physical systems (CCPSs) during the conceptual stages of design. This method is referred to as the Function Failure Propagation Potential Methodology (FFPPM). This research is motivated by recent trends in engineering design. As systems become increasingly connected, an open area of research for CCPSs is to move reliability and failure assessments earlier in the engineering design process. This allows practitioners to make decisions at a point in the design process where the decision has a high impact and a low cost. Standard methods are limited by the availability of data and often rely on detailed representations of the system. As such, they have not addressed failure propagation in the functional design prior to selecting candidate architectures. To develop the metrics, graph theory is used to model and quantify the connectedness of the functional block diagram (FBD). These metrics quantify (1) the summation of the reachability matrix and (2) the summation of the number of paths between nodes (functions within system models) i and j for all i and j. From a practical standpoint, these metrics quantify the reachability between functions in the graph and the number of paths between functions defines the failure propagation potential of that failure. The unique contribution of this research is to quantify failure propagation potential during conceptual design prior to selecting candidate architectures. The goal of these metrics is to produce derived system requirements, based on an analysis, that focus on minimizing the impact of failures.",
author = "O'Halloran, {Bryan M.} and Nikolaos Papakonstantinou and Kristin Giammarco and Bossuyt, {Douglas L. Van}",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1002/j.2334-5837.2017.00459.x",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "1734--1748",
journal = "INCOSE International Symposium",
issn = "2334-5837",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "1",

}

A Graph Theory Approach to Functional Failure Propagation in Early Complex Cyber-Physical Systems (CCPSs). / O'Halloran, Bryan M.; Papakonstantinou, Nikolaos; Giammarco, Kristin; Bossuyt, Douglas L. Van.

In: INCOSE International Symposium, Vol. 27, No. 1, 2017, p. 1734-1748.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - A Graph Theory Approach to Functional Failure Propagation in Early Complex Cyber-Physical Systems (CCPSs)

AU - O'Halloran, Bryan M.

AU - Papakonstantinou, Nikolaos

AU - Giammarco, Kristin

AU - Bossuyt, Douglas L. Van

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - This paper presents a framework to quantify failure propagation potential for complex, cyber-physical systems (CCPSs) during the conceptual stages of design. This method is referred to as the Function Failure Propagation Potential Methodology (FFPPM). This research is motivated by recent trends in engineering design. As systems become increasingly connected, an open area of research for CCPSs is to move reliability and failure assessments earlier in the engineering design process. This allows practitioners to make decisions at a point in the design process where the decision has a high impact and a low cost. Standard methods are limited by the availability of data and often rely on detailed representations of the system. As such, they have not addressed failure propagation in the functional design prior to selecting candidate architectures. To develop the metrics, graph theory is used to model and quantify the connectedness of the functional block diagram (FBD). These metrics quantify (1) the summation of the reachability matrix and (2) the summation of the number of paths between nodes (functions within system models) i and j for all i and j. From a practical standpoint, these metrics quantify the reachability between functions in the graph and the number of paths between functions defines the failure propagation potential of that failure. The unique contribution of this research is to quantify failure propagation potential during conceptual design prior to selecting candidate architectures. The goal of these metrics is to produce derived system requirements, based on an analysis, that focus on minimizing the impact of failures.

AB - This paper presents a framework to quantify failure propagation potential for complex, cyber-physical systems (CCPSs) during the conceptual stages of design. This method is referred to as the Function Failure Propagation Potential Methodology (FFPPM). This research is motivated by recent trends in engineering design. As systems become increasingly connected, an open area of research for CCPSs is to move reliability and failure assessments earlier in the engineering design process. This allows practitioners to make decisions at a point in the design process where the decision has a high impact and a low cost. Standard methods are limited by the availability of data and often rely on detailed representations of the system. As such, they have not addressed failure propagation in the functional design prior to selecting candidate architectures. To develop the metrics, graph theory is used to model and quantify the connectedness of the functional block diagram (FBD). These metrics quantify (1) the summation of the reachability matrix and (2) the summation of the number of paths between nodes (functions within system models) i and j for all i and j. From a practical standpoint, these metrics quantify the reachability between functions in the graph and the number of paths between functions defines the failure propagation potential of that failure. The unique contribution of this research is to quantify failure propagation potential during conceptual design prior to selecting candidate architectures. The goal of these metrics is to produce derived system requirements, based on an analysis, that focus on minimizing the impact of failures.

U2 - 10.1002/j.2334-5837.2017.00459.x

DO - 10.1002/j.2334-5837.2017.00459.x

M3 - Article

VL - 27

SP - 1734

EP - 1748

JO - INCOSE International Symposium

JF - INCOSE International Symposium

SN - 2334-5837

IS - 1

ER -