A thermodynamic model of contact angle hysteresis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When a three-phase contact line moves along a solid surface, the contact angle no longer corresponds to the static equilibrium angle but is larger when the liquid is advancing and smaller when the liquid is receding. The difference between the advancing and receding contact angles, i.e., the contact angle hysteresis, is of paramount importance in wetting and capillarity. For example, it determines the magnitude of the external force that is required to make a drop slide on a solid surface. Until now, fundamental origin of the contact angle hysteresis has been controversial. Here, this origin is revealed and a quantitative theory is derived. The theory is corroborated by the available experimental data for a large number of solid-liquid combinations. The theory is applied in modelling the contact angle hysteresis on a textured surface, and these results are also in quantitative agreement with the experimental data.

Original languageEnglish
Article number064703
JournalJournal of Chemical Physics
Volume147
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fingerprint

Contact angle
Hysteresis
hysteresis
Thermodynamics
thermodynamics
Liquids
solid surfaces
liquids
Capillarity
Contacts (fluid mechanics)
Wetting
chutes
wetting

Cite this

@article{df7486806f684c40a0f5bcbef4223dd9,
title = "A thermodynamic model of contact angle hysteresis",
abstract = "When a three-phase contact line moves along a solid surface, the contact angle no longer corresponds to the static equilibrium angle but is larger when the liquid is advancing and smaller when the liquid is receding. The difference between the advancing and receding contact angles, i.e., the contact angle hysteresis, is of paramount importance in wetting and capillarity. For example, it determines the magnitude of the external force that is required to make a drop slide on a solid surface. Until now, fundamental origin of the contact angle hysteresis has been controversial. Here, this origin is revealed and a quantitative theory is derived. The theory is corroborated by the available experimental data for a large number of solid-liquid combinations. The theory is applied in modelling the contact angle hysteresis on a textured surface, and these results are also in quantitative agreement with the experimental data.",
author = "Lasse Makkonen",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1063/1.4996912",
language = "English",
volume = "147",
journal = "Journal of Chemical Physics",
issn = "0021-9606",
publisher = "American Institute of Physics AIP",
number = "6",

}

A thermodynamic model of contact angle hysteresis. / Makkonen, Lasse.

In: Journal of Chemical Physics, Vol. 147, No. 6, 064703, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - A thermodynamic model of contact angle hysteresis

AU - Makkonen, Lasse

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - When a three-phase contact line moves along a solid surface, the contact angle no longer corresponds to the static equilibrium angle but is larger when the liquid is advancing and smaller when the liquid is receding. The difference between the advancing and receding contact angles, i.e., the contact angle hysteresis, is of paramount importance in wetting and capillarity. For example, it determines the magnitude of the external force that is required to make a drop slide on a solid surface. Until now, fundamental origin of the contact angle hysteresis has been controversial. Here, this origin is revealed and a quantitative theory is derived. The theory is corroborated by the available experimental data for a large number of solid-liquid combinations. The theory is applied in modelling the contact angle hysteresis on a textured surface, and these results are also in quantitative agreement with the experimental data.

AB - When a three-phase contact line moves along a solid surface, the contact angle no longer corresponds to the static equilibrium angle but is larger when the liquid is advancing and smaller when the liquid is receding. The difference between the advancing and receding contact angles, i.e., the contact angle hysteresis, is of paramount importance in wetting and capillarity. For example, it determines the magnitude of the external force that is required to make a drop slide on a solid surface. Until now, fundamental origin of the contact angle hysteresis has been controversial. Here, this origin is revealed and a quantitative theory is derived. The theory is corroborated by the available experimental data for a large number of solid-liquid combinations. The theory is applied in modelling the contact angle hysteresis on a textured surface, and these results are also in quantitative agreement with the experimental data.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85027346891&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1063/1.4996912

DO - 10.1063/1.4996912

M3 - Article

VL - 147

JO - Journal of Chemical Physics

JF - Journal of Chemical Physics

SN - 0021-9606

IS - 6

M1 - 064703

ER -