A TRAC study of gene expression in wort fermentations reveals novel aspects of the regulation of sugar transport and membrane synthesis

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference abstract in proceedingsScientific

Abstract

During wort fermentations yeast must efficiently use the major wort sugars, glucose, maltose and maltotriose. The first step is transport across the cell membrane. Transport is determined by the presence or absence of appropriate sugar transporters and also by the membrane's lipid composition. Under laboratory conditions, glucose represses the expression of genes for ?-glucosidases (maltases) and maltose and maltotriose transporters. Further, biosynthesis of sterols and unsaturated fatty acids requires oxygen. Because oxygen is present only at the start of brewery fermentations, yeast membranes are deficient in these lipids at the end of such fermentations. To help understand how brewer's yeasts adjust their physiology to changing sugar composition and oxygen availability during fermentation of brewer's wort, we used the rapid TRAC technology to follow expression of several genes involved in sugar uptake and lipid synthesis. Lager yeasts are hybrids containing components from both S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus genomes. We followed the expression of over 70 S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus genes at frequent intervals (up to every 2 h) through tall tube wort fermentations by industrially cropped lager yeast. Genes for maltose and maltotriose metabolism (MALx1, MALx2 and the S. bayanus MTT1) showed strong co-ordinate increases before glucose began to be used and declined while maltose concentrations were still high. Expression of genes for ergosterol synthesis (needed for correct membrane function) peaked in the first few hours and again late in fermentation when oxygen was absent. Evidently the physiology of lager yeast fermenting wort diverges from that of laboratory strains in laboratory media.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication3rd European Federation of Biotechnology Conference
Subtitle of host publicationPhysiology of Yeasts and Filamentous Fungi PYFF3
Place of PublicationEspoo
PublisherVTT Technical Research Centre of Finland
Pages102
ISBN (Electronic)978-951-38-6314-2
ISBN (Print)978-951-38-6313-5
Publication statusPublished - 2007
Event3rd European Federation of Biotechnology Conference : Physiology of Yeasts and Filamentous Fungi - Helsinki, Finland
Duration: 13 Jun 200716 Jun 2007

Publication series

SeriesVTT Symposium
Number245
ISSN0357-9387

Conference

Conference3rd European Federation of Biotechnology Conference
Abbreviated titlePYFF3
CountryFinland
CityHelsinki
Period13/06/0716/06/07

Fingerprint

wort (brewing)
brewers yeast
fermentation
maltotriose
maltose
sugars
gene expression
synthesis
oxygen
glucose
transporters
physiology
yeasts
glucosidases
brewing industry
ergosterol
alpha-glucosidase
lipids
lipid composition
unsaturated fatty acids

Cite this

Rautio, J., Vidgren, V., Londesborough, J., & Huuskonen, A. (2007). A TRAC study of gene expression in wort fermentations reveals novel aspects of the regulation of sugar transport and membrane synthesis. In 3rd European Federation of Biotechnology Conference: Physiology of Yeasts and Filamentous Fungi PYFF3 (pp. 102). [P49] Espoo: VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. VTT Symposium, No. 245
Rautio, Jari ; Vidgren, Virve ; Londesborough, John ; Huuskonen, Anne. / A TRAC study of gene expression in wort fermentations reveals novel aspects of the regulation of sugar transport and membrane synthesis. 3rd European Federation of Biotechnology Conference: Physiology of Yeasts and Filamentous Fungi PYFF3. Espoo : VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, 2007. pp. 102 (VTT Symposium; No. 245).
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abstract = "During wort fermentations yeast must efficiently use the major wort sugars, glucose, maltose and maltotriose. The first step is transport across the cell membrane. Transport is determined by the presence or absence of appropriate sugar transporters and also by the membrane's lipid composition. Under laboratory conditions, glucose represses the expression of genes for ?-glucosidases (maltases) and maltose and maltotriose transporters. Further, biosynthesis of sterols and unsaturated fatty acids requires oxygen. Because oxygen is present only at the start of brewery fermentations, yeast membranes are deficient in these lipids at the end of such fermentations. To help understand how brewer's yeasts adjust their physiology to changing sugar composition and oxygen availability during fermentation of brewer's wort, we used the rapid TRAC technology to follow expression of several genes involved in sugar uptake and lipid synthesis. Lager yeasts are hybrids containing components from both S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus genomes. We followed the expression of over 70 S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus genes at frequent intervals (up to every 2 h) through tall tube wort fermentations by industrially cropped lager yeast. Genes for maltose and maltotriose metabolism (MALx1, MALx2 and the S. bayanus MTT1) showed strong co-ordinate increases before glucose began to be used and declined while maltose concentrations were still high. Expression of genes for ergosterol synthesis (needed for correct membrane function) peaked in the first few hours and again late in fermentation when oxygen was absent. Evidently the physiology of lager yeast fermenting wort diverges from that of laboratory strains in laboratory media.",
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Rautio, J, Vidgren, V, Londesborough, J & Huuskonen, A 2007, A TRAC study of gene expression in wort fermentations reveals novel aspects of the regulation of sugar transport and membrane synthesis. in 3rd European Federation of Biotechnology Conference: Physiology of Yeasts and Filamentous Fungi PYFF3., P49, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, VTT Symposium, no. 245, pp. 102, 3rd European Federation of Biotechnology Conference , Helsinki, Finland, 13/06/07.

A TRAC study of gene expression in wort fermentations reveals novel aspects of the regulation of sugar transport and membrane synthesis. / Rautio, Jari; Vidgren, Virve; Londesborough, John; Huuskonen, Anne.

3rd European Federation of Biotechnology Conference: Physiology of Yeasts and Filamentous Fungi PYFF3. Espoo : VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, 2007. p. 102 P49 (VTT Symposium; No. 245).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference abstract in proceedingsScientific

TY - CHAP

T1 - A TRAC study of gene expression in wort fermentations reveals novel aspects of the regulation of sugar transport and membrane synthesis

AU - Rautio, Jari

AU - Vidgren, Virve

AU - Londesborough, John

AU - Huuskonen, Anne

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - During wort fermentations yeast must efficiently use the major wort sugars, glucose, maltose and maltotriose. The first step is transport across the cell membrane. Transport is determined by the presence or absence of appropriate sugar transporters and also by the membrane's lipid composition. Under laboratory conditions, glucose represses the expression of genes for ?-glucosidases (maltases) and maltose and maltotriose transporters. Further, biosynthesis of sterols and unsaturated fatty acids requires oxygen. Because oxygen is present only at the start of brewery fermentations, yeast membranes are deficient in these lipids at the end of such fermentations. To help understand how brewer's yeasts adjust their physiology to changing sugar composition and oxygen availability during fermentation of brewer's wort, we used the rapid TRAC technology to follow expression of several genes involved in sugar uptake and lipid synthesis. Lager yeasts are hybrids containing components from both S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus genomes. We followed the expression of over 70 S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus genes at frequent intervals (up to every 2 h) through tall tube wort fermentations by industrially cropped lager yeast. Genes for maltose and maltotriose metabolism (MALx1, MALx2 and the S. bayanus MTT1) showed strong co-ordinate increases before glucose began to be used and declined while maltose concentrations were still high. Expression of genes for ergosterol synthesis (needed for correct membrane function) peaked in the first few hours and again late in fermentation when oxygen was absent. Evidently the physiology of lager yeast fermenting wort diverges from that of laboratory strains in laboratory media.

AB - During wort fermentations yeast must efficiently use the major wort sugars, glucose, maltose and maltotriose. The first step is transport across the cell membrane. Transport is determined by the presence or absence of appropriate sugar transporters and also by the membrane's lipid composition. Under laboratory conditions, glucose represses the expression of genes for ?-glucosidases (maltases) and maltose and maltotriose transporters. Further, biosynthesis of sterols and unsaturated fatty acids requires oxygen. Because oxygen is present only at the start of brewery fermentations, yeast membranes are deficient in these lipids at the end of such fermentations. To help understand how brewer's yeasts adjust their physiology to changing sugar composition and oxygen availability during fermentation of brewer's wort, we used the rapid TRAC technology to follow expression of several genes involved in sugar uptake and lipid synthesis. Lager yeasts are hybrids containing components from both S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus genomes. We followed the expression of over 70 S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus genes at frequent intervals (up to every 2 h) through tall tube wort fermentations by industrially cropped lager yeast. Genes for maltose and maltotriose metabolism (MALx1, MALx2 and the S. bayanus MTT1) showed strong co-ordinate increases before glucose began to be used and declined while maltose concentrations were still high. Expression of genes for ergosterol synthesis (needed for correct membrane function) peaked in the first few hours and again late in fermentation when oxygen was absent. Evidently the physiology of lager yeast fermenting wort diverges from that of laboratory strains in laboratory media.

M3 - Conference abstract in proceedings

SN - 978-951-38-6313-5

T3 - VTT Symposium

SP - 102

BT - 3rd European Federation of Biotechnology Conference

PB - VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland

CY - Espoo

ER -

Rautio J, Vidgren V, Londesborough J, Huuskonen A. A TRAC study of gene expression in wort fermentations reveals novel aspects of the regulation of sugar transport and membrane synthesis. In 3rd European Federation of Biotechnology Conference: Physiology of Yeasts and Filamentous Fungi PYFF3. Espoo: VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. 2007. p. 102. P49. (VTT Symposium; No. 245).