Acetylation enhances the tabletting properties of starch

P. Raatikainen, O. Korhonen, Soili Peltonen, P. Paronen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was the evaluation of starch acetate (SA) powders used as tablet excipients. Deformation during powder volume reduction, strain-rate sensitivity, intrinsic elasticity of the materials, and tensile strength of the tablets were examined.
Results showed that SA with the lowest degree of substitution (ds) still possessed characteristics of native starch granules. Due to dissolution in synthesis, the properties of higher ds SAs depended on precipitation and drying processes.
The acetate moiety, perhaps in combination with existing hydroxyl groups, was a very effective bond-forming substituent. The formation of strong molecular bonds increased, leading to a very firm and intact tablet structure. Small changes existed in compression-induced deformation due to acetylation.
Some fragmentation was induced due to the slightly harder and more irregular shape of high-substituted SA particles. The plastic flow under compression was enhanced. Acetylated material was slightly less sensitive to fast elastic recovery in-die, but somewhat more elastic out-of-die. In spite of their superior bonding, SAs under compression behaved similarly to native starches.
It was concluded that deformation properties were more the consequence of the molecular chain structure properties of the starch polymer than the effect of the acetate moiety itself. In contrast, the opposite seemed to be the case with the extensive improvement in bond-forming properties.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)165-175
JournalDrug Development and Industrial Pharmacy
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fingerprint

Acetylation
Starch
Tablets
Powders
Acetates
Substitution reactions
Tensile Strength
Excipients
Elasticity
Molecular Structure
Plastic flow
Hydroxyl Radical
Plastics
Strain rate
Drying
Polymers
Dissolution
Compaction
Tensile strength
Recovery

Keywords

  • elasticity
  • mechanical strength
  • plastic flow
  • starch acetates
  • strain-rate sensitivity
  • tabletting
  • biopolymers

Cite this

Raatikainen, P. ; Korhonen, O. ; Peltonen, Soili ; Paronen, P. / Acetylation enhances the tabletting properties of starch. In: Drug Development and Industrial Pharmacy. 2002 ; Vol. 28, No. 2. pp. 165-175.
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Raatikainen, P, Korhonen, O, Peltonen, S & Paronen, P 2002, 'Acetylation enhances the tabletting properties of starch', Drug Development and Industrial Pharmacy, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 165-175. https://doi.org/10.1081/DDC-120002450

Acetylation enhances the tabletting properties of starch. / Raatikainen, P.; Korhonen, O.; Peltonen, Soili; Paronen, P.

In: Drug Development and Industrial Pharmacy, Vol. 28, No. 2, 2002, p. 165-175.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Acetylation enhances the tabletting properties of starch

AU - Raatikainen, P.

AU - Korhonen, O.

AU - Peltonen, Soili

AU - Paronen, P.

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N2 - The aim of this study was the evaluation of starch acetate (SA) powders used as tablet excipients. Deformation during powder volume reduction, strain-rate sensitivity, intrinsic elasticity of the materials, and tensile strength of the tablets were examined. Results showed that SA with the lowest degree of substitution (ds) still possessed characteristics of native starch granules. Due to dissolution in synthesis, the properties of higher ds SAs depended on precipitation and drying processes. The acetate moiety, perhaps in combination with existing hydroxyl groups, was a very effective bond-forming substituent. The formation of strong molecular bonds increased, leading to a very firm and intact tablet structure. Small changes existed in compression-induced deformation due to acetylation. Some fragmentation was induced due to the slightly harder and more irregular shape of high-substituted SA particles. The plastic flow under compression was enhanced. Acetylated material was slightly less sensitive to fast elastic recovery in-die, but somewhat more elastic out-of-die. In spite of their superior bonding, SAs under compression behaved similarly to native starches. It was concluded that deformation properties were more the consequence of the molecular chain structure properties of the starch polymer than the effect of the acetate moiety itself. In contrast, the opposite seemed to be the case with the extensive improvement in bond-forming properties.

AB - The aim of this study was the evaluation of starch acetate (SA) powders used as tablet excipients. Deformation during powder volume reduction, strain-rate sensitivity, intrinsic elasticity of the materials, and tensile strength of the tablets were examined. Results showed that SA with the lowest degree of substitution (ds) still possessed characteristics of native starch granules. Due to dissolution in synthesis, the properties of higher ds SAs depended on precipitation and drying processes. The acetate moiety, perhaps in combination with existing hydroxyl groups, was a very effective bond-forming substituent. The formation of strong molecular bonds increased, leading to a very firm and intact tablet structure. Small changes existed in compression-induced deformation due to acetylation. Some fragmentation was induced due to the slightly harder and more irregular shape of high-substituted SA particles. The plastic flow under compression was enhanced. Acetylated material was slightly less sensitive to fast elastic recovery in-die, but somewhat more elastic out-of-die. In spite of their superior bonding, SAs under compression behaved similarly to native starches. It was concluded that deformation properties were more the consequence of the molecular chain structure properties of the starch polymer than the effect of the acetate moiety itself. In contrast, the opposite seemed to be the case with the extensive improvement in bond-forming properties.

KW - elasticity

KW - mechanical strength

KW - plastic flow

KW - starch acetates

KW - strain-rate sensitivity

KW - tabletting

KW - biopolymers

U2 - 10.1081/DDC-120002450

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