Acoustic design of a best-in-class drill rig cabin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference article in proceedingsScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Drill rigs used for percussive rock drilling are sources of intense high-frequency noise. A drill rig manufacturer targeted the in-cabin A-weighted noise level at the operator's position during drilling to be less than 75 dB. The target sets very strict demands on the noise reduction capability of a cabin. As is well known, considerable modifications to a final product are very difficult. Therefore, the cabin acoustic design process, described in this paper, was started eighteen months before the manufactured cabin was available for assessment. Thanks to the early, proactive start, the result is a cabin with an excellent acoustic performance and the target was successfully met. The most critical cabin component group is glazing, which covers some 40 % of the outer surface of the cabin. Much effort was put on simulation-based acoustic design, optimization and selection of thick, multi-layer laminated glasses. Another critical factor emphasized is control of leakage, especially avoidance of imperceptible leaks in door seals, plate junctions etc. Due to the harsh working environment, the possibility to use porous materials for enhanced absorption is very limited. Numerical simulations using SEA and experiments conducted in various phases of the process are described. Experimental results of the final product are compared to early predictions and updated simulations. Uncertainties arising from incomplete data available in the early design stages, rig operating environment as well as from the methods themselves are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the International Congress on Sound and Vibration (ICSV24)
PublisherInternational Institute of Acoustics and Vibration IIAV
Pages2866-2873
ISBN (Print)978-1-5108-4585-5
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017
MoE publication typeA4 Article in a conference publication
Event24th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, ICSV 2017 - London, United Kingdom
Duration: 23 Jul 201727 Jul 2017

Conference

Conference24th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, ICSV 2017
Abbreviated title ICSV 2017
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period23/07/1727/07/17

Fingerprint

cabins
acoustics
drilling
simulation
avoidance
design optimization
porous materials
products
noise reduction
leakage
rocks
operators
glass
predictions

Keywords

  • cabin acoustics
  • low noise design
  • noise reduction
  • sea

Cite this

Tanttari, J., & Lamula, L. (2017). Acoustic design of a best-in-class drill rig cabin. In Proceedings of the International Congress on Sound and Vibration (ICSV24) (pp. 2866-2873). International Institute of Acoustics and Vibration IIAV.
Tanttari, Jukka ; Lamula, Lasse. / Acoustic design of a best-in-class drill rig cabin. Proceedings of the International Congress on Sound and Vibration (ICSV24). International Institute of Acoustics and Vibration IIAV, 2017. pp. 2866-2873
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Tanttari, J & Lamula, L 2017, Acoustic design of a best-in-class drill rig cabin. in Proceedings of the International Congress on Sound and Vibration (ICSV24). International Institute of Acoustics and Vibration IIAV, pp. 2866-2873, 24th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, ICSV 2017, London, United Kingdom, 23/07/17.

Acoustic design of a best-in-class drill rig cabin. / Tanttari, Jukka; Lamula, Lasse.

Proceedings of the International Congress on Sound and Vibration (ICSV24). International Institute of Acoustics and Vibration IIAV, 2017. p. 2866-2873.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference article in proceedingsScientificpeer-review

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Tanttari J, Lamula L. Acoustic design of a best-in-class drill rig cabin. In Proceedings of the International Congress on Sound and Vibration (ICSV24). International Institute of Acoustics and Vibration IIAV. 2017. p. 2866-2873