Acquired obesity is associated with changes in the serum lipidomic profile independent of genetic effects: A monozygotic twin study

Kirsi H. Pietiläinen, Marko Sysi-Aho, Aila Rissanen, Tuulikki Seppänen-Laakso, Hannele Yki-Järvinen, Jaakko Kaprio, Matej Oresic (Corresponding Author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

258 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Both genetic and environmental factors are involved in the etiology of obesity and the associated lipid disturbances. We determined whether acquired obesity is associated with changes in global serum lipid profiles independent of genetic factors in young adult monozygotic (MZ) twins. 14 healthy MZ pairs discordant for obesity (10 to 25 kg weight difference) and ten weight concordant control pairs aged 24–27 years were identified from a large population-based study. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by the euglycemic clamp technique, and body composition by DEXA (% body fat) and by MRI (subcutaneous and intra-abdominal fat). Global characterization of lipid molecular species in serum was performed by a lipidomics strategy using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Obesity, independent of genetic influences, was primarily related to increases in lysophosphatidylcholines, lipids found in proinflammatory and proatherogenic conditions and to decreases in ether phospholipids, which are known to have antioxidant properties. These lipid changes were associated with insulin resistance, a pathogonomic characteristic of acquired obesity in these young adult twins. Our results show that obesity, already in its early stages and independent of genetic influences, is associated with deleterious alterations in the lipid metabolism known to facilitate atherogenesis, inflammation and insulin resistance.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere218
Number of pages14
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fingerprint

Twin Studies
Monozygotic Twins
obesity
Obesity
Lipids
Serum
insulin resistance
Insulin Resistance
Insulin
lipids
young adults
Phospholipid Ethers
Fats
Young Adult
Weight control
Lysophosphatidylcholines
Liquid chromatography
Clamping devices
Weights and Measures
atherogenesis

Cite this

Pietiläinen, Kirsi H. ; Sysi-Aho, Marko ; Rissanen, Aila ; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki ; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele ; Kaprio, Jaakko ; Oresic, Matej. / Acquired obesity is associated with changes in the serum lipidomic profile independent of genetic effects : A monozygotic twin study. In: PLoS ONE. 2007 ; Vol. 2, No. 2.
@article{ff910aba83714b918a1907de2ea1e123,
title = "Acquired obesity is associated with changes in the serum lipidomic profile independent of genetic effects: A monozygotic twin study",
abstract = "Both genetic and environmental factors are involved in the etiology of obesity and the associated lipid disturbances. We determined whether acquired obesity is associated with changes in global serum lipid profiles independent of genetic factors in young adult monozygotic (MZ) twins. 14 healthy MZ pairs discordant for obesity (10 to 25 kg weight difference) and ten weight concordant control pairs aged 24–27 years were identified from a large population-based study. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by the euglycemic clamp technique, and body composition by DEXA ({\%} body fat) and by MRI (subcutaneous and intra-abdominal fat). Global characterization of lipid molecular species in serum was performed by a lipidomics strategy using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Obesity, independent of genetic influences, was primarily related to increases in lysophosphatidylcholines, lipids found in proinflammatory and proatherogenic conditions and to decreases in ether phospholipids, which are known to have antioxidant properties. These lipid changes were associated with insulin resistance, a pathogonomic characteristic of acquired obesity in these young adult twins. Our results show that obesity, already in its early stages and independent of genetic influences, is associated with deleterious alterations in the lipid metabolism known to facilitate atherogenesis, inflammation and insulin resistance.",
author = "Pietil{\"a}inen, {Kirsi H.} and Marko Sysi-Aho and Aila Rissanen and Tuulikki Sepp{\"a}nen-Laakso and Hannele Yki-J{\"a}rvinen and Jaakko Kaprio and Matej Oresic",
year = "2007",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0000218",
language = "English",
volume = "2",
journal = "PLoS ONE",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "2",

}

Acquired obesity is associated with changes in the serum lipidomic profile independent of genetic effects : A monozygotic twin study. / Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Sysi-Aho, Marko; Rissanen, Aila; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele; Kaprio, Jaakko; Oresic, Matej (Corresponding Author).

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 2, No. 2, e218, 2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Acquired obesity is associated with changes in the serum lipidomic profile independent of genetic effects

T2 - A monozygotic twin study

AU - Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.

AU - Sysi-Aho, Marko

AU - Rissanen, Aila

AU - Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki

AU - Yki-Järvinen, Hannele

AU - Kaprio, Jaakko

AU - Oresic, Matej

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - Both genetic and environmental factors are involved in the etiology of obesity and the associated lipid disturbances. We determined whether acquired obesity is associated with changes in global serum lipid profiles independent of genetic factors in young adult monozygotic (MZ) twins. 14 healthy MZ pairs discordant for obesity (10 to 25 kg weight difference) and ten weight concordant control pairs aged 24–27 years were identified from a large population-based study. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by the euglycemic clamp technique, and body composition by DEXA (% body fat) and by MRI (subcutaneous and intra-abdominal fat). Global characterization of lipid molecular species in serum was performed by a lipidomics strategy using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Obesity, independent of genetic influences, was primarily related to increases in lysophosphatidylcholines, lipids found in proinflammatory and proatherogenic conditions and to decreases in ether phospholipids, which are known to have antioxidant properties. These lipid changes were associated with insulin resistance, a pathogonomic characteristic of acquired obesity in these young adult twins. Our results show that obesity, already in its early stages and independent of genetic influences, is associated with deleterious alterations in the lipid metabolism known to facilitate atherogenesis, inflammation and insulin resistance.

AB - Both genetic and environmental factors are involved in the etiology of obesity and the associated lipid disturbances. We determined whether acquired obesity is associated with changes in global serum lipid profiles independent of genetic factors in young adult monozygotic (MZ) twins. 14 healthy MZ pairs discordant for obesity (10 to 25 kg weight difference) and ten weight concordant control pairs aged 24–27 years were identified from a large population-based study. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by the euglycemic clamp technique, and body composition by DEXA (% body fat) and by MRI (subcutaneous and intra-abdominal fat). Global characterization of lipid molecular species in serum was performed by a lipidomics strategy using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Obesity, independent of genetic influences, was primarily related to increases in lysophosphatidylcholines, lipids found in proinflammatory and proatherogenic conditions and to decreases in ether phospholipids, which are known to have antioxidant properties. These lipid changes were associated with insulin resistance, a pathogonomic characteristic of acquired obesity in these young adult twins. Our results show that obesity, already in its early stages and independent of genetic influences, is associated with deleterious alterations in the lipid metabolism known to facilitate atherogenesis, inflammation and insulin resistance.

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0000218

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0000218

M3 - Article

VL - 2

JO - PLoS ONE

JF - PLoS ONE

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 2

M1 - e218

ER -