Analysis of maintenance strategies

Kari Laakso, Kaisa Simola

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference article in proceedingsScientificpeer-review

Abstract

The most nuclear power utilities have established goals and objectives for their nuclear power plants, including e.g. 1) operating the plant effectively from primarily the safety and secondly the economic point of view, 2) ensuring safety of the public and the plant workers, and 3) providing uninterrupted electric power to the shareholders with long-term minimum cost. The maintenance goals should reflect these goals at a more functional level. In a larger perspective, the goal of the plant maintenance and op-erability activities may be assurance of long-term asset management by keeping the plant continuously in a good condition like new (Mokka 1996). Avoiding faults causing plant disturbances during the operating period may be the most important performance goal which should not be put in danger by minimis-ing the number of maintenance work during the annual maintenance and refuelling outage. More detailed goals and objectives may be to carry out the necessary work at the optimal time during the outages or operation, and to minimise the unavailability time of safety related equipment. One internal objective may be to carry out the maintenance work at budgeted cost. It is expected that every maintenance organisation will, together with its parent organisation, identify its own goals and objectives (EURO-MAINE 1997).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationRATU2: The Finnish Research Programme on the Structural Integrity of Nuclear Power Plants
Subtitle of host publicationSynthesis of achievements 1995-1998
Place of PublicationEspoo
PublisherVTT Technical Research Centre of Finland
Pages251-261
ISBN (Electronic)951-38-5264-4
ISBN (Print)951-38-5263-6
Publication statusPublished - 1998
MoE publication typeA4 Article in a conference publication
EventRATU2: The Finnish Research Programme on the Structural Integrity of Nuclear Power Plants: Synthesis of achievements 1995−1998 - Espoo, Finland
Duration: 7 Dec 19987 Dec 1998

Publication series

SeriesVTT Symposium
Number190
ISSN0357-9387

Conference

ConferenceRATU2: The Finnish Research Programme on the Structural Integrity of Nuclear Power Plants
CountryFinland
CityEspoo
Period7/12/987/12/98

Fingerprint

Outages
Asset management
Shareholders
Nuclear energy
Nuclear power plants
Costs
Economics

Cite this

Laakso, K., & Simola, K. (1998). Analysis of maintenance strategies. In RATU2: The Finnish Research Programme on the Structural Integrity of Nuclear Power Plants: Synthesis of achievements 1995-1998 (pp. 251-261). Espoo: VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. VTT Symposium, No. 190
Laakso, Kari ; Simola, Kaisa. / Analysis of maintenance strategies. RATU2: The Finnish Research Programme on the Structural Integrity of Nuclear Power Plants: Synthesis of achievements 1995-1998. Espoo : VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, 1998. pp. 251-261 (VTT Symposium; No. 190).
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Laakso, K & Simola, K 1998, Analysis of maintenance strategies. in RATU2: The Finnish Research Programme on the Structural Integrity of Nuclear Power Plants: Synthesis of achievements 1995-1998. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, VTT Symposium, no. 190, pp. 251-261, RATU2: The Finnish Research Programme on the Structural Integrity of Nuclear Power Plants, Espoo, Finland, 7/12/98.

Analysis of maintenance strategies. / Laakso, Kari; Simola, Kaisa.

RATU2: The Finnish Research Programme on the Structural Integrity of Nuclear Power Plants: Synthesis of achievements 1995-1998. Espoo : VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, 1998. p. 251-261 (VTT Symposium; No. 190).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference article in proceedingsScientificpeer-review

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Laakso K, Simola K. Analysis of maintenance strategies. In RATU2: The Finnish Research Programme on the Structural Integrity of Nuclear Power Plants: Synthesis of achievements 1995-1998. Espoo: VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. 1998. p. 251-261. (VTT Symposium; No. 190).