Applying a cryptographic metric to post-quantum lattice-based signature algorithms

Markus Rautell, Outi Marja Latvala, Visa Vallivaara, Kimmo Halunen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference article in proceedingsScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Measuring the security of cryptographic systems is not a simple task. Nevertheless, there is an increasing need for a cryptographic metric which could assist in decision making when choosing between various candidates. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has launched a process to standardize quantum-resistance public key encryption, key encapsulation and digital signature algorithms. This is NIST's response to the threat posed by quantum computers against classical public key cryptography. In this paper, we apply a metric taxonomy, produced by earlier studies, to two NIST third round finalist digital signature algorithms Dilithium and Falcon in order to asses the effectiveness and extensiveness of the metric. Although, our results show that clear differences can be found with used metrics, we propose some improvements to them to allow more comprehensive analysis.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 17th International Conference on Availability, Reliability and Security, ARES 2022
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Pages8
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-4503-9670-7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Aug 2022
MoE publication typeA4 Article in a conference publication
Event17th International Conference on Availability, Reliability and Security, ARES 2022 - Vienna, Austria
Duration: 23 Aug 202226 Aug 2022

Publication series

SeriesACM International Conference Proceeding Series

Conference

Conference17th International Conference on Availability, Reliability and Security, ARES 2022
Country/TerritoryAustria
CityVienna
Period23/08/2226/08/22

Keywords

  • Lattice Encryption
  • Metrics
  • Post-Quantum Cryptography
  • Signatures

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