Are applied science threads more monopolistic?

S Carley, Arho Suominen, K Boyack, A L Porter

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference article in proceedingsScientificpeer-review

Abstract

We analyze if we can identify applied research through it being more monopolistic than basic research. Focusing on micro-communities within a case technology, the dye-sensitized solar cell, we seek to identify market structures within these communities that correlate with how basic or applied their science is. Combining economic measures of competitiveness with a ranking scheme provided by the National Science Foundation we show that more competitive market structures are more basic - attracting more citations, whereas, more applied R&D tends to be more localized in fewer organizations, presumably with different motivations. These results are useful as we try to identify how a technology emerges to being a commercially viable technology. Although there has been an active discussion if the linear model of technological development holds true - to an extent, we would presume some that there should be applied research prior to commercial application. Identifying the structure of this research enables a more holistic portrait of the landscape of a technology
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of PICMET 2013
Subtitle of host publicationPortland International Conference on Management of Engineering & Technology
PublisherIEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers
Pages1258-1267
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-4799-1149-3
ISBN (Print)978-1-8908-4327-4
Publication statusPublished - 2013
MoE publication typeNot Eligible
EventPortland International Conference on Management of Engineering and Technology, PICMET 2013: Technology Management in the IT-Driven Services - San Jose Marriott Hotel, San Jose, United States
Duration: 28 Jul 20131 Aug 2013

Conference

ConferencePortland International Conference on Management of Engineering and Technology, PICMET 2013
Abbreviated titlePICMET '13
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose
Period28/07/131/08/13

Fingerprint

Thread
Applied research
Market structure
Dyes
Ranking
Competitiveness
Correlates
Economics
Basic research
Competitive market
Citations
Technological development

Cite this

Carley, S., Suominen, A., Boyack, K., & Porter, A. L. (2013). Are applied science threads more monopolistic? In Proceedings of PICMET 2013: Portland International Conference on Management of Engineering & Technology (pp. 1258-1267). IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers .
Carley, S ; Suominen, Arho ; Boyack, K ; Porter, A L. / Are applied science threads more monopolistic?. Proceedings of PICMET 2013: Portland International Conference on Management of Engineering & Technology . IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers , 2013. pp. 1258-1267
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Carley, S, Suominen, A, Boyack, K & Porter, AL 2013, Are applied science threads more monopolistic? in Proceedings of PICMET 2013: Portland International Conference on Management of Engineering & Technology . IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers , pp. 1258-1267, Portland International Conference on Management of Engineering and Technology, PICMET 2013, San Jose, United States, 28/07/13.

Are applied science threads more monopolistic? / Carley, S; Suominen, Arho; Boyack, K; Porter, A L.

Proceedings of PICMET 2013: Portland International Conference on Management of Engineering & Technology . IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers , 2013. p. 1258-1267.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference article in proceedingsScientificpeer-review

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AB - We analyze if we can identify applied research through it being more monopolistic than basic research. Focusing on micro-communities within a case technology, the dye-sensitized solar cell, we seek to identify market structures within these communities that correlate with how basic or applied their science is. Combining economic measures of competitiveness with a ranking scheme provided by the National Science Foundation we show that more competitive market structures are more basic - attracting more citations, whereas, more applied R&D tends to be more localized in fewer organizations, presumably with different motivations. These results are useful as we try to identify how a technology emerges to being a commercially viable technology. Although there has been an active discussion if the linear model of technological development holds true - to an extent, we would presume some that there should be applied research prior to commercial application. Identifying the structure of this research enables a more holistic portrait of the landscape of a technology

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Carley S, Suominen A, Boyack K, Porter AL. Are applied science threads more monopolistic? In Proceedings of PICMET 2013: Portland International Conference on Management of Engineering & Technology . IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers . 2013. p. 1258-1267