Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification

Mika Vähä-Nissi (Corresponding Author), Jenni Sievänen, Erkki Salo, Pirjo Heikkilä, Eija Kenttä, Leena-Sisko Johansson, Jorma T. Koskinen, Ali Harlin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas-solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin - even non-uniform - atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7-11
JournalJournal of Solid State Chemistry
Volume214
Issue numberJune
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fingerprint

Surface treatment
Oxides
cycles
Biopolymers
lactic acid
biopolymers
Surface reactions
pinholes
Lactic acid
Polymer films
solid surfaces
printing
surface reactions
Extrusion
metal oxides
Printing
Monolayers
Lactic Acid
adhesion
Adhesion

Keywords

  • adhesion
  • atomic layer deposition
  • hybrid
  • inorganic
  • surface treatment

Cite this

Vähä-Nissi, Mika ; Sievänen, Jenni ; Salo, Erkki ; Heikkilä, Pirjo ; Kenttä, Eija ; Johansson, Leena-Sisko ; Koskinen, Jorma T. ; Harlin, Ali. / Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification. In: Journal of Solid State Chemistry. 2014 ; Vol. 214, No. June. pp. 7-11.
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abstract = "Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas-solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin - even non-uniform - atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid.",
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Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification. / Vähä-Nissi, Mika (Corresponding Author); Sievänen, Jenni; Salo, Erkki; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Kenttä, Eija; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Koskinen, Jorma T.; Harlin, Ali.

In: Journal of Solid State Chemistry, Vol. 214, No. June, 2014, p. 7-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification

AU - Vähä-Nissi, Mika

AU - Sievänen, Jenni

AU - Salo, Erkki

AU - Heikkilä, Pirjo

AU - Kenttä, Eija

AU - Johansson, Leena-Sisko

AU - Koskinen, Jorma T.

AU - Harlin, Ali

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PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

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AB - Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas-solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin - even non-uniform - atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid.

KW - adhesion

KW - atomic layer deposition

KW - hybrid

KW - inorganic

KW - surface treatment

U2 - 10.1016/j.jssc.2013.11.040

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M3 - Article

VL - 214

SP - 7

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JO - Journal of Solid State Chemistry

JF - Journal of Solid State Chemistry

SN - 0022-4596

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