Automatic fault tree generation from multidisciplinary dependency models for early failure propagation assessment

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference article in proceedingsScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Safety engineering for complex systems is a very challenging task and the industry has a firm basis and trust on a set of established methods like the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA). New methodologies for system engineering are being proposed by academia, some related to safety, but they have a limited chance for successful adoption by the safety industry unless they provide a clear connection and benefit in relation to the traditional methodologies. Model-Based System Engineering (MBSE) has produced multiple safety related applications. In past work system models were used to generate event trees, failure propagation scenarios and for early human reliability analyses. This paper extends previous work, on a high-level interdisciplinary system model for early defense in depth assessment, to support the automatic generation of fault tree statements for specific critical system components. These statements can then be combined into fault trees using software already utilized by the industry. The fault trees can then be linked to event trees in order to provide a more complete picture of an initiating event, the mitigating functions and critical components that are involved. The produced fault trees use a worst-case scenario approach by stating that if a dependency exists then the failure propagation is certain. Our proposed method doesn’t consider specific failure modes and related probabilities, a safety expert can use them as a starting point for further development. The methodology is demonstrated with a case study of a spent fuel pool cooling system of a nuclear plant.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationASME 2018 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference
Subtitle of host publication38th Computers and Information in Engineering Conference
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers ASME
Number of pages10
Volume1B
ISBN (Electronic)978-0-7918-5173-9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018
MoE publication typeNot Eligible
EventInternational Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference - Quebec City, Canada
Duration: 26 Aug 201829 Aug 2018

Conference

ConferenceInternational Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference
Abbreviated titleIDETC/CIE 2018
CountryCanada
CityQuebec City
Period26/08/1829/08/18

Fingerprint

Propagation Failure
Fault Tree
Safety
Systems engineering
Systems Engineering
Industry
Methodology
Safety engineering
Spent fuels
Cooling systems
Scenarios
Model
Risk assessment
Failure modes
Failure Mode
Large scale systems
Risk Assessment
Cooling
Complex Systems
Model-based

Cite this

Papakonstantinou, N., Alanen, J., Linnosmaa, J., & O'Halloran, B. (2018). Automatic fault tree generation from multidisciplinary dependency models for early failure propagation assessment. In ASME 2018 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference: 38th Computers and Information in Engineering Conference (Vol. 1B). [DETC2018-85189] American Society of Mechanical Engineers ASME. https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2018-85189
Papakonstantinou, Nikolaos ; Alanen, Jarmo ; Linnosmaa, Joonas ; O'Halloran, Bryan. / Automatic fault tree generation from multidisciplinary dependency models for early failure propagation assessment. ASME 2018 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference: 38th Computers and Information in Engineering Conference. Vol. 1B American Society of Mechanical Engineers ASME, 2018.
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Papakonstantinou, N, Alanen, J, Linnosmaa, J & O'Halloran, B 2018, Automatic fault tree generation from multidisciplinary dependency models for early failure propagation assessment. in ASME 2018 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference: 38th Computers and Information in Engineering Conference. vol. 1B, DETC2018-85189, American Society of Mechanical Engineers ASME, International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, Quebec City, Canada, 26/08/18. https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2018-85189

Automatic fault tree generation from multidisciplinary dependency models for early failure propagation assessment. / Papakonstantinou, Nikolaos; Alanen, Jarmo; Linnosmaa, Joonas; O'Halloran, Bryan.

ASME 2018 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference: 38th Computers and Information in Engineering Conference. Vol. 1B American Society of Mechanical Engineers ASME, 2018. DETC2018-85189.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference article in proceedingsScientificpeer-review

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Papakonstantinou N, Alanen J, Linnosmaa J, O'Halloran B. Automatic fault tree generation from multidisciplinary dependency models for early failure propagation assessment. In ASME 2018 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference: 38th Computers and Information in Engineering Conference. Vol. 1B. American Society of Mechanical Engineers ASME. 2018. DETC2018-85189 https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2018-85189