Barley as an ingredient for functional food products

Juhani Sibakov, Ulla Holopainen, Olavi Myllymäki, Tapani Suortti, Anu Kaukovirta-Norja, Annika Wilhelmson, Pekka Lehtinen

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOther conference contributionScientific

Abstract

Compared to other cereals, the food use of barley is limited. However, barley is a highly potential raw material for health promoting dietary fiber, resistant starch, minerals and vitamins. Of the major cereal crops, barley and oats have the highest contents of beta-glucan, a soluble dietary fiber component in cereal cell walls. Beta-glucan in barley is distributed throughout the kernel, making traditional aleurone bran separation processes inefficient in concentrating barley beta-glucan. However, the separation can be intensified by raw material selection. Beta-glucan incorporation into beverage applications is challenging due to the high viscosity and structural instability. By applying methods that reduce beta-glucan molecular weight and inactivate endogenous glucanolytic activities, the suitability of beta-glucan in beverages can be enhanced. From the literature, several methods are available for reductions of molecular weight of beta-glucan. These include enzymatic hydrolysis, mechanical shear stress and acid catalyzed hydrolysis. A new protocol based on acid catalyzed hydrolysis produces beta-glucan with narrow molecular weight distribution and total inactivation of endogenous activities. This material can be incorporated in beverages to provide around 10 g of beta-glucan in one serving. The beta-glucan in this type of product is stabile over wide range of pH values and temperatures. Both barley and malt are natural ingredients that could be used to a greater extent in non-alcoholic beverages, combined with, for example berries and fruit juices. Drinks are easy to carry and consume, which make them convenient, daily supplies of dietary fiber for the modern consumer.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2009
MoE publication typeNot Eligible
EventThe 14th Australian Barley Technical Symposium - Sunshine Coast , Australia
Duration: 13 Sep 200916 Sep 2009

Conference

ConferenceThe 14th Australian Barley Technical Symposium
CountryAustralia
CitySunshine Coast
Period13/09/0916/09/09

Fingerprint

beta-glucans
functional foods
foods
ingredients
barley
beverages
dietary fiber
fruit juices
acid hydrolysis
molecular weight
raw materials
grain foods
health promotion
resistant starch
malt
bran
concentrating
enzymatic hydrolysis
grain crops
shear stress

Cite this

Sibakov, J., Holopainen, U., Myllymäki, O., Suortti, T., Kaukovirta-Norja, A., Wilhelmson, A., & Lehtinen, P. (2009). Barley as an ingredient for functional food products. The 14th Australian Barley Technical Symposium, Sunshine Coast , Australia.
Sibakov, Juhani ; Holopainen, Ulla ; Myllymäki, Olavi ; Suortti, Tapani ; Kaukovirta-Norja, Anu ; Wilhelmson, Annika ; Lehtinen, Pekka. / Barley as an ingredient for functional food products. The 14th Australian Barley Technical Symposium, Sunshine Coast , Australia.
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abstract = "Compared to other cereals, the food use of barley is limited. However, barley is a highly potential raw material for health promoting dietary fiber, resistant starch, minerals and vitamins. Of the major cereal crops, barley and oats have the highest contents of beta-glucan, a soluble dietary fiber component in cereal cell walls. Beta-glucan in barley is distributed throughout the kernel, making traditional aleurone bran separation processes inefficient in concentrating barley beta-glucan. However, the separation can be intensified by raw material selection. Beta-glucan incorporation into beverage applications is challenging due to the high viscosity and structural instability. By applying methods that reduce beta-glucan molecular weight and inactivate endogenous glucanolytic activities, the suitability of beta-glucan in beverages can be enhanced. From the literature, several methods are available for reductions of molecular weight of beta-glucan. These include enzymatic hydrolysis, mechanical shear stress and acid catalyzed hydrolysis. A new protocol based on acid catalyzed hydrolysis produces beta-glucan with narrow molecular weight distribution and total inactivation of endogenous activities. This material can be incorporated in beverages to provide around 10 g of beta-glucan in one serving. The beta-glucan in this type of product is stabile over wide range of pH values and temperatures. Both barley and malt are natural ingredients that could be used to a greater extent in non-alcoholic beverages, combined with, for example berries and fruit juices. Drinks are easy to carry and consume, which make them convenient, daily supplies of dietary fiber for the modern consumer.",
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Sibakov, J, Holopainen, U, Myllymäki, O, Suortti, T, Kaukovirta-Norja, A, Wilhelmson, A & Lehtinen, P 2009, 'Barley as an ingredient for functional food products' The 14th Australian Barley Technical Symposium, Sunshine Coast , Australia, 13/09/09 - 16/09/09, .

Barley as an ingredient for functional food products. / Sibakov, Juhani; Holopainen, Ulla; Myllymäki, Olavi; Suortti, Tapani; Kaukovirta-Norja, Anu; Wilhelmson, Annika; Lehtinen, Pekka.

2009. The 14th Australian Barley Technical Symposium, Sunshine Coast , Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOther conference contributionScientific

TY - CONF

T1 - Barley as an ingredient for functional food products

AU - Sibakov, Juhani

AU - Holopainen, Ulla

AU - Myllymäki, Olavi

AU - Suortti, Tapani

AU - Kaukovirta-Norja, Anu

AU - Wilhelmson, Annika

AU - Lehtinen, Pekka

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - Compared to other cereals, the food use of barley is limited. However, barley is a highly potential raw material for health promoting dietary fiber, resistant starch, minerals and vitamins. Of the major cereal crops, barley and oats have the highest contents of beta-glucan, a soluble dietary fiber component in cereal cell walls. Beta-glucan in barley is distributed throughout the kernel, making traditional aleurone bran separation processes inefficient in concentrating barley beta-glucan. However, the separation can be intensified by raw material selection. Beta-glucan incorporation into beverage applications is challenging due to the high viscosity and structural instability. By applying methods that reduce beta-glucan molecular weight and inactivate endogenous glucanolytic activities, the suitability of beta-glucan in beverages can be enhanced. From the literature, several methods are available for reductions of molecular weight of beta-glucan. These include enzymatic hydrolysis, mechanical shear stress and acid catalyzed hydrolysis. A new protocol based on acid catalyzed hydrolysis produces beta-glucan with narrow molecular weight distribution and total inactivation of endogenous activities. This material can be incorporated in beverages to provide around 10 g of beta-glucan in one serving. The beta-glucan in this type of product is stabile over wide range of pH values and temperatures. Both barley and malt are natural ingredients that could be used to a greater extent in non-alcoholic beverages, combined with, for example berries and fruit juices. Drinks are easy to carry and consume, which make them convenient, daily supplies of dietary fiber for the modern consumer.

AB - Compared to other cereals, the food use of barley is limited. However, barley is a highly potential raw material for health promoting dietary fiber, resistant starch, minerals and vitamins. Of the major cereal crops, barley and oats have the highest contents of beta-glucan, a soluble dietary fiber component in cereal cell walls. Beta-glucan in barley is distributed throughout the kernel, making traditional aleurone bran separation processes inefficient in concentrating barley beta-glucan. However, the separation can be intensified by raw material selection. Beta-glucan incorporation into beverage applications is challenging due to the high viscosity and structural instability. By applying methods that reduce beta-glucan molecular weight and inactivate endogenous glucanolytic activities, the suitability of beta-glucan in beverages can be enhanced. From the literature, several methods are available for reductions of molecular weight of beta-glucan. These include enzymatic hydrolysis, mechanical shear stress and acid catalyzed hydrolysis. A new protocol based on acid catalyzed hydrolysis produces beta-glucan with narrow molecular weight distribution and total inactivation of endogenous activities. This material can be incorporated in beverages to provide around 10 g of beta-glucan in one serving. The beta-glucan in this type of product is stabile over wide range of pH values and temperatures. Both barley and malt are natural ingredients that could be used to a greater extent in non-alcoholic beverages, combined with, for example berries and fruit juices. Drinks are easy to carry and consume, which make them convenient, daily supplies of dietary fiber for the modern consumer.

M3 - Other conference contribution

ER -

Sibakov J, Holopainen U, Myllymäki O, Suortti T, Kaukovirta-Norja A, Wilhelmson A et al. Barley as an ingredient for functional food products. 2009. The 14th Australian Barley Technical Symposium, Sunshine Coast , Australia.