Best practices for integrating the concurrent engineering environment into multipartner project management

Mary Karlsson, Antti Lakka, Kristiina Sulankivi, Awad S. Hanna (Corresponding Author), Benjamin P. Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of the Internet, e-mail, and other technologies has been steadily filtering into the building process, creating a concurrent engineering (CE) environment, and enabling collaborative efforts in the building process. The concurrent engineering environment is established by a variety of tools, including internet accessible servers, e-mail, mobile telephones, and many other existing CE tools. Organizations involved in the construction process recognize the need for assessment of benefits resulting from CE tools, but find the evaluation of these benefits difficult and complicated. The project presented in this paper, “project management and organization in the concurrent engineering environment (ProCE),” is applicable to both researchers and practitioners. The ProCE project developed a measuring model, which may be used by future researchers in this area, attempted to measure benefits derived from using the CE environment in construction design and project management routines, and developed guidelines for best practice implementation by practitioners, based on four case studies. The project included the measurement of both the quantitative and qualitative benefit of CE environment implementation in building construction projects using tools that were readily available through application service providers. Measurement of cost and other quantifiable benefits have been extensively studied. Therefore, the majority of the discussion in the current paper will address the ProCE project’s measurement of qualitative benefits.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)289-299
JournalJournal of Construction Engineering and Management
Volume134
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fingerprint

Concurrent engineering
Project management
Internet
Telephone sets
Best practice
Servers
Costs

Keywords

  • Benefit cost ratios
  • Construction industry
  • Information technology (IT)
  • Project management

Cite this

Karlsson, Mary ; Lakka, Antti ; Sulankivi, Kristiina ; Hanna, Awad S. ; Thompson, Benjamin P. / Best practices for integrating the concurrent engineering environment into multipartner project management. In: Journal of Construction Engineering and Management. 2008 ; Vol. 134, No. 4. pp. 289-299.
@article{6479e60a682349ab8876a1042736e6e3,
title = "Best practices for integrating the concurrent engineering environment into multipartner project management",
abstract = "The use of the Internet, e-mail, and other technologies has been steadily filtering into the building process, creating a concurrent engineering (CE) environment, and enabling collaborative efforts in the building process. The concurrent engineering environment is established by a variety of tools, including internet accessible servers, e-mail, mobile telephones, and many other existing CE tools. Organizations involved in the construction process recognize the need for assessment of benefits resulting from CE tools, but find the evaluation of these benefits difficult and complicated. The project presented in this paper, “project management and organization in the concurrent engineering environment (ProCE),” is applicable to both researchers and practitioners. The ProCE project developed a measuring model, which may be used by future researchers in this area, attempted to measure benefits derived from using the CE environment in construction design and project management routines, and developed guidelines for best practice implementation by practitioners, based on four case studies. The project included the measurement of both the quantitative and qualitative benefit of CE environment implementation in building construction projects using tools that were readily available through application service providers. Measurement of cost and other quantifiable benefits have been extensively studied. Therefore, the majority of the discussion in the current paper will address the ProCE project’s measurement of qualitative benefits.",
keywords = "Benefit cost ratios, Construction industry, Information technology (IT), Project management",
author = "Mary Karlsson and Antti Lakka and Kristiina Sulankivi and Hanna, {Awad S.} and Thompson, {Benjamin P.}",
year = "2008",
doi = "10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9364(2008)134:4(289)",
language = "English",
volume = "134",
pages = "289--299",
journal = "Journal of Construction Engineering and Management",
issn = "0733-9364",
publisher = "American Society of Civil Engineers ASCE",
number = "4",

}

Best practices for integrating the concurrent engineering environment into multipartner project management. / Karlsson, Mary; Lakka, Antti; Sulankivi, Kristiina; Hanna, Awad S. (Corresponding Author); Thompson, Benjamin P.

In: Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, Vol. 134, No. 4, 2008, p. 289-299.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Best practices for integrating the concurrent engineering environment into multipartner project management

AU - Karlsson, Mary

AU - Lakka, Antti

AU - Sulankivi, Kristiina

AU - Hanna, Awad S.

AU - Thompson, Benjamin P.

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - The use of the Internet, e-mail, and other technologies has been steadily filtering into the building process, creating a concurrent engineering (CE) environment, and enabling collaborative efforts in the building process. The concurrent engineering environment is established by a variety of tools, including internet accessible servers, e-mail, mobile telephones, and many other existing CE tools. Organizations involved in the construction process recognize the need for assessment of benefits resulting from CE tools, but find the evaluation of these benefits difficult and complicated. The project presented in this paper, “project management and organization in the concurrent engineering environment (ProCE),” is applicable to both researchers and practitioners. The ProCE project developed a measuring model, which may be used by future researchers in this area, attempted to measure benefits derived from using the CE environment in construction design and project management routines, and developed guidelines for best practice implementation by practitioners, based on four case studies. The project included the measurement of both the quantitative and qualitative benefit of CE environment implementation in building construction projects using tools that were readily available through application service providers. Measurement of cost and other quantifiable benefits have been extensively studied. Therefore, the majority of the discussion in the current paper will address the ProCE project’s measurement of qualitative benefits.

AB - The use of the Internet, e-mail, and other technologies has been steadily filtering into the building process, creating a concurrent engineering (CE) environment, and enabling collaborative efforts in the building process. The concurrent engineering environment is established by a variety of tools, including internet accessible servers, e-mail, mobile telephones, and many other existing CE tools. Organizations involved in the construction process recognize the need for assessment of benefits resulting from CE tools, but find the evaluation of these benefits difficult and complicated. The project presented in this paper, “project management and organization in the concurrent engineering environment (ProCE),” is applicable to both researchers and practitioners. The ProCE project developed a measuring model, which may be used by future researchers in this area, attempted to measure benefits derived from using the CE environment in construction design and project management routines, and developed guidelines for best practice implementation by practitioners, based on four case studies. The project included the measurement of both the quantitative and qualitative benefit of CE environment implementation in building construction projects using tools that were readily available through application service providers. Measurement of cost and other quantifiable benefits have been extensively studied. Therefore, the majority of the discussion in the current paper will address the ProCE project’s measurement of qualitative benefits.

KW - Benefit cost ratios

KW - Construction industry

KW - Information technology (IT)

KW - Project management

U2 - 10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9364(2008)134:4(289)

DO - 10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9364(2008)134:4(289)

M3 - Article

VL - 134

SP - 289

EP - 299

JO - Journal of Construction Engineering and Management

JF - Journal of Construction Engineering and Management

SN - 0733-9364

IS - 4

ER -