Carbon efficient building solutions

Miimu Airaksinen (Corresponding Author), Pellervo Matilainen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Traditionally, the Finnish legislation have focused on energy use and especially on energy used for heating space in buildings. However, in many cases this does not lead to the optimal concept in respect to minimizing green house gases. This paper studies how CO2 emission levels are affected by different measures to reduce energy use in buildings. This paper presents two real apartment buildings with different options of energy efficiency and power sources. The calculations clearly show that in the future electricity and domestic hot water use will have high importance in respect to energy efficiency, and therefore also CO2 equivalent (eq) emissions. The importance increases when the energy efficiency of the building increases. There are big differences between average Finnish production and individual power plants; CO2 eq emissions might nearly double depending on the energy source and the power plant type. Both a building with an efficient district heating as a power source, and a building with ground heat in addition to nuclear power electricity as a complimentary electricity source performed very similarly to each other in respect to CO2 eq emissions. However, it is dangerous to conclude that it is not important which energy source is chosen. If hypothetically, the use of district heating would dramatically drop, the primary energy factor and CO2 eq emissions from electricity would rise, which in turn would lead to the increase of the ground heat systems emissions. A problem in the yearly calculations is that the fact that it is very important, sometimes even crucial, when energy is needed, is always excluded.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)844-858
Number of pages15
JournalSustainability
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fingerprint

Electricity
energy
Energy efficiency
Carbon
District heating
carbon
electricity
energy efficiency
district heating
Power plants
energy use
power plant
energy source
Space heating
efficiency
heat
Greenhouse gases
Nuclear energy
building
apartment building

Keywords

  • energy efficiency
  • primary energy
  • building concepts

Cite this

Airaksinen, M., & Matilainen, P. (2010). Carbon efficient building solutions. Sustainability, 2(3), 844-858. https://doi.org/10.3390/su2030844
Airaksinen, Miimu ; Matilainen, Pellervo. / Carbon efficient building solutions. In: Sustainability. 2010 ; Vol. 2, No. 3. pp. 844-858.
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Airaksinen, M & Matilainen, P 2010, 'Carbon efficient building solutions', Sustainability, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 844-858. https://doi.org/10.3390/su2030844

Carbon efficient building solutions. / Airaksinen, Miimu (Corresponding Author); Matilainen, Pellervo.

In: Sustainability, Vol. 2, No. 3, 2010, p. 844-858.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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