Changes in bran structure by bioprocessing with enzymes and yeast modifies the in vitro digestibility and fermentability of bran protein and dietary fibre complex

Emilia Nordlund (Corresponding Author), Kati Katina, Anna-Marja Aura, Kaisa Poutanen

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    54 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Bran is a good source of dietary fibre, phytochemicals, and also protein, but highly insoluble and recalcitrant structure of bran hinders accessibility of these components for gastrointestinal digestion. In the present work, influence of bioprocessing on the microstructure and chemical properties of rye bran and wheat bread fortified with the rye bran were studied. In vitro protein digestibility, and release of short chain fatty acids (SCFA) and ferulic acid in a gut model were studied. Bioprocessing of rye bran was performed with subsequent treatments with cell-wall hydrolysing enzymes (40 °C, 4 h) and yeast fermentation (20 °C, 20 h). Bioprocessing of rye bran resulted in reduced total dietary fibre content, caused mainly by degradation of fructan and β-glucan, and increased soluble fibre content, caused mainly by solubilisation of arabinoxylans. Microscopic analysis revealed degradation of aleurone cell wall structure of the bioprocessed rye bran. Bioprocessing caused release of protein from aleurone cells, assessed as a larger content of soluble protein in bran and a higher hydrolysis rate in vitro. Bioprocessed bran had also faster SCFA formation and ferulic acid release in the colon fermentation in vitro as compared to native bran.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)200-208
    Number of pages8
    JournalJournal of Cereal Science
    Volume58
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013
    MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

    Keywords

    • bioprocessing
    • bran
    • digestion
    • enzymes
    • protein
    • yeast

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Changes in bran structure by bioprocessing with enzymes and yeast modifies the <i>in</i> <i>vitro</i> digestibility and fermentability of bran protein and dietary fibre complex'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this