Characterisation of barley-associated bacteria and their impact on wort separation performance

Arja Laitila (Corresponding Author), Jenny Manninen, Outi Priha, Katherine Smart, Irina Tsitko, Sue James

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Wort separation is one of the rate-limiting steps in the brewhouse. It is a complex process, influenced by barley components such as proteins, β-glucans, residual starch and lipids. Filtration performance may also be influenced by microbial biofilms forming on the outer layers of the grains. This study aimed to identify the main barley-associated bacteria influencing wort separation efficiency. Next-generation sequencing was applied to characterise indigenous bacterial communities associated with Overture barley from different geographical locations as well as the bacterial population dynamics during laboratory-scale malting. In order to study the weakened filtration performance potentially caused by induced bacterial biofilm formation, a small portion of barley (5-12%) was subjected to mild husk damage prior to steeping. The bacterial communities were dominated by Gammaproteobacteria, accounting for >70% of the total bacterial population. Bacterial growth induction significantly decreased wort filtration performance. A content of ~12% of injured grains decreased the rate of wort separation by up to 25%, with over 10% lower extract yields. This study showed that bacteria associated with barley are one of the key factors influencing wort separation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)314-324
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the Institute of Brewing
Volume124
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018
MoE publication typeNot Eligible

Fingerprint

wort (brewing)
Hordeum
barley
Bacteria
bacteria
Biofilms
bacterial communities
biofilm
Gammaproteobacteria
malting
Glucans
gamma-Proteobacteria
Population Dynamics
Geographical Locations
glucans
soaking
hulls
Starch
microbial growth
population dynamics

Keywords

  • Bacteria
  • Barley
  • Biofilm
  • Malt
  • Microbial diversity
  • Sequencing
  • Wort separation

Cite this

Laitila, Arja ; Manninen, Jenny ; Priha, Outi ; Smart, Katherine ; Tsitko, Irina ; James, Sue. / Characterisation of barley-associated bacteria and their impact on wort separation performance. In: Journal of the Institute of Brewing. 2018 ; Vol. 124, No. 4. pp. 314-324.
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Characterisation of barley-associated bacteria and their impact on wort separation performance. / Laitila, Arja (Corresponding Author); Manninen, Jenny; Priha, Outi; Smart, Katherine; Tsitko, Irina; James, Sue.

In: Journal of the Institute of Brewing, Vol. 124, No. 4, 01.01.2018, p. 314-324.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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