Characterization of wear surfaces in dry sliding of steel and alumina on hydrogenated and hydrogen-free carbon films

Helena Ronkainen, Jari Koskinen, Jari Likonen, Simo Varjus, Jarmo Vihersalo

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    64 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon coatings were deposited by r.f. plasma and hydrogen-free carbon films in pulsed arc discharge on stainless steel substrates. The coatings were characterized and evaluated in tribological tests. Pin-on-disc tests were used over a wide range of test parameters: normal load, 5–40 N; sliding velocity, 0.1–3.0 m s−1. The wear of both coatings was of the same order of magnitude (0.7 × 10−3−5.1 × 10−3 mm3). However, the wear of the counterface was one order of magnitude higher for the hydrogenfree carbon coatings. Increasing the normal load generally caused an increase in coating wear and in most cases also an increase in counterface wear. When the steel pin was sliding against the hydrogenated carbon coating with a high sliding velocity and load, a rather thick tribofilm was formed on the pin wear surface, lowering the coefficient of friction and reducing the pin wear. The tribofilm formed on the alumina pin sliding against the hydrogenated carbon film also seemed to reduce the friction coefficient but could not prevent the pin wear. A tribofilm was also formed on the pin wear surface when the hydrogen-free carbon coating was sliding against the steel and alumina pins, but the layer was not able to protect the pins. The tribofilm did, however, lower the coefficient of friction, which was rather insensitive to the different test parameters used. According to secondary ion mass spectroscopy analyses, material transfer of the pin was detected on the disc (coated) wear surfaces. The tribofilms formed on the pin wear surfaces consisted of pin material, hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1329-1336
    Number of pages8
    JournalDiamond and Related Materials
    Volume3
    Issue number11-12
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1994
    MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

    Fingerprint

    Aluminum Oxide
    Steel
    Carbon films
    Hydrogen
    Alumina
    Wear of materials
    Coatings
    Carbon
    Friction
    Stainless Steel
    Amorphous carbon
    Stainless steel
    Spectroscopy
    Ions
    Oxygen
    Plasmas

    Cite this

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    title = "Characterization of wear surfaces in dry sliding of steel and alumina on hydrogenated and hydrogen-free carbon films",
    abstract = "Hydrogenated amorphous carbon coatings were deposited by r.f. plasma and hydrogen-free carbon films in pulsed arc discharge on stainless steel substrates. The coatings were characterized and evaluated in tribological tests. Pin-on-disc tests were used over a wide range of test parameters: normal load, 5–40 N; sliding velocity, 0.1–3.0 m s−1. The wear of both coatings was of the same order of magnitude (0.7 × 10−3−5.1 × 10−3 mm3). However, the wear of the counterface was one order of magnitude higher for the hydrogenfree carbon coatings. Increasing the normal load generally caused an increase in coating wear and in most cases also an increase in counterface wear. When the steel pin was sliding against the hydrogenated carbon coating with a high sliding velocity and load, a rather thick tribofilm was formed on the pin wear surface, lowering the coefficient of friction and reducing the pin wear. The tribofilm formed on the alumina pin sliding against the hydrogenated carbon film also seemed to reduce the friction coefficient but could not prevent the pin wear. A tribofilm was also formed on the pin wear surface when the hydrogen-free carbon coating was sliding against the steel and alumina pins, but the layer was not able to protect the pins. The tribofilm did, however, lower the coefficient of friction, which was rather insensitive to the different test parameters used. According to secondary ion mass spectroscopy analyses, material transfer of the pin was detected on the disc (coated) wear surfaces. The tribofilms formed on the pin wear surfaces consisted of pin material, hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon.",
    author = "Helena Ronkainen and Jari Koskinen and Jari Likonen and Simo Varjus and Jarmo Vihersalo",
    note = "Project code: VAL15001",
    year = "1994",
    doi = "10.1016/0925-9635(94)90147-3",
    language = "English",
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    pages = "1329--1336",
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    Characterization of wear surfaces in dry sliding of steel and alumina on hydrogenated and hydrogen-free carbon films. / Ronkainen, Helena; Koskinen, Jari; Likonen, Jari; Varjus, Simo; Vihersalo, Jarmo.

    In: Diamond and Related Materials, Vol. 3, No. 11-12, 1994, p. 1329-1336.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Characterization of wear surfaces in dry sliding of steel and alumina on hydrogenated and hydrogen-free carbon films

    AU - Ronkainen, Helena

    AU - Koskinen, Jari

    AU - Likonen, Jari

    AU - Varjus, Simo

    AU - Vihersalo, Jarmo

    N1 - Project code: VAL15001

    PY - 1994

    Y1 - 1994

    N2 - Hydrogenated amorphous carbon coatings were deposited by r.f. plasma and hydrogen-free carbon films in pulsed arc discharge on stainless steel substrates. The coatings were characterized and evaluated in tribological tests. Pin-on-disc tests were used over a wide range of test parameters: normal load, 5–40 N; sliding velocity, 0.1–3.0 m s−1. The wear of both coatings was of the same order of magnitude (0.7 × 10−3−5.1 × 10−3 mm3). However, the wear of the counterface was one order of magnitude higher for the hydrogenfree carbon coatings. Increasing the normal load generally caused an increase in coating wear and in most cases also an increase in counterface wear. When the steel pin was sliding against the hydrogenated carbon coating with a high sliding velocity and load, a rather thick tribofilm was formed on the pin wear surface, lowering the coefficient of friction and reducing the pin wear. The tribofilm formed on the alumina pin sliding against the hydrogenated carbon film also seemed to reduce the friction coefficient but could not prevent the pin wear. A tribofilm was also formed on the pin wear surface when the hydrogen-free carbon coating was sliding against the steel and alumina pins, but the layer was not able to protect the pins. The tribofilm did, however, lower the coefficient of friction, which was rather insensitive to the different test parameters used. According to secondary ion mass spectroscopy analyses, material transfer of the pin was detected on the disc (coated) wear surfaces. The tribofilms formed on the pin wear surfaces consisted of pin material, hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon.

    AB - Hydrogenated amorphous carbon coatings were deposited by r.f. plasma and hydrogen-free carbon films in pulsed arc discharge on stainless steel substrates. The coatings were characterized and evaluated in tribological tests. Pin-on-disc tests were used over a wide range of test parameters: normal load, 5–40 N; sliding velocity, 0.1–3.0 m s−1. The wear of both coatings was of the same order of magnitude (0.7 × 10−3−5.1 × 10−3 mm3). However, the wear of the counterface was one order of magnitude higher for the hydrogenfree carbon coatings. Increasing the normal load generally caused an increase in coating wear and in most cases also an increase in counterface wear. When the steel pin was sliding against the hydrogenated carbon coating with a high sliding velocity and load, a rather thick tribofilm was formed on the pin wear surface, lowering the coefficient of friction and reducing the pin wear. The tribofilm formed on the alumina pin sliding against the hydrogenated carbon film also seemed to reduce the friction coefficient but could not prevent the pin wear. A tribofilm was also formed on the pin wear surface when the hydrogen-free carbon coating was sliding against the steel and alumina pins, but the layer was not able to protect the pins. The tribofilm did, however, lower the coefficient of friction, which was rather insensitive to the different test parameters used. According to secondary ion mass spectroscopy analyses, material transfer of the pin was detected on the disc (coated) wear surfaces. The tribofilms formed on the pin wear surfaces consisted of pin material, hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon.

    U2 - 10.1016/0925-9635(94)90147-3

    DO - 10.1016/0925-9635(94)90147-3

    M3 - Article

    VL - 3

    SP - 1329

    EP - 1336

    JO - Diamond and Related Materials

    JF - Diamond and Related Materials

    SN - 0925-9635

    IS - 11-12

    ER -