Chemical additives in hydrothermal treatments: effects on saccharification and on the properties of hydrolysis lignin from pine, birch and willow wood

Marc Borrega, Ville Pihlajaniemi, Tarja Tamminen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference article in proceedingsScientificpeer-review

Abstract

The use of chemical additives (1- and 2-naphthol, formaldehyde) in hydrothermal treatments of pine, birch, and willow wood was here evaluated as a means to improve the subsequent saccharification by enzymatic hydrolysis. In pine wood, the addition of 2-naphthol increased enzymatic saccharification from 20% up to 50% compared to water-only experiments. In birch and willow, almost complete (>90%) saccharification could be achieved even without additives. In willow, saccharification was partly hindered by the presence of bark, but the addition of 2-naphthol or formaldehyde slightly increased the sugar yields.
The effects of chemical additives on the properties of the lignin residues left after enzymatic hydrolysis of birch wood were also investigated. The use of 1- and 2-naphthol resulted in hydrolysis lignins with lower molar mass than in the case of water-only experiments. The use of 2-naphthol also induced changes to the chemical structure of lignin, which may provide advantages for its subsequent utilization in material applications.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication20th International Symposium on Wood, Fiber and Pulping Chemistry - Proceedings, ISWFPC
Number of pages4
Publication statusPublished - 2019
MoE publication typeNot Eligible
Event20th International Symposium on Wood, Fiber and Pulping Chemistry - Tokyo, Japan
Duration: 9 Sep 201911 Sep 2019
http://www.woodchemistry.fp.a.u-tokyo.ac.jp/20thiswfpc.htm

Conference

Conference20th International Symposium on Wood, Fiber and Pulping Chemistry
Country/TerritoryJapan
CityTokyo
Period9/09/1911/09/19
Internet address

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