Comparison between different abstraction level programming: Experiment definition and initial results

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference article in proceedingsScientificpeer-review

    Abstract

    Domain-specific languages and especially domain-specific modeling languages (DSML) are mentioned to achieve 5-10 times performance gains compared to traditional software development practices due to raising the level of abstraction. The data for the cases where these gains have been witnessed is usually not available. Therefore, in this paper, we introduce a simple but comprehensive and affordable experiment framework which can be utilized for measuring the benefits and drawbacks of DSMLs in an open fashion, i.e. publishing the data and the results and enabling a possibility to repeat the experiment by others. In this paper, we also present our own experiences and initial results about the benefits and drawbacks. We found the benefits of DSML to be clear if the applications have to be implemented daily and especially if the platform continues to evolve and the existing applications have to be updated to correspond to the changes. The benefits of utilizing DSML in a domain where the platform continues to evolve came as a surprise and needs further study.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings
    Subtitle of host publication7th OOPSLA Workshop on Domain-Specific Modeling 2007
    PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery ACM
    ISBN (Print)978-1-59593-865-7
    Publication statusPublished - 2007
    MoE publication typeA4 Article in a conference publication
    Event7th OOPSLA Workshop on Domain-Specific Modeling 2007 - Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Duration: 21 Oct 200725 Oct 2007

    Conference

    Conference7th OOPSLA Workshop on Domain-Specific Modeling 2007
    CountryCanada
    CityMontreal, Quebec
    Period21/10/0725/10/07

    Keywords

    • Domain-specific modeling languages

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