Contribution of industrial and developing countries to the atmospheric CO2 concentrations : Impact of the Kyoto Protocol

Riitta Korhonen (Corresponding Author), Ilkka Savolainen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto protocol made under the Convention, aim at controlling the greenhouse gas emissions and their concentrations in the atmosphere. The contributions of fossil fuel use in industrial and developing countries to the atmospheric CO2 concentration are calculated using estimates for emission developments and a simple carbon cycle model. The contribution of the industrial countries to the CO2 concentration increase, above the preindustrial level, is estimated to be about 50 ppm in 1990 if only the emissions from fossil fuels are considered. The contribution from developing countries is about 15 ppm. The contribution from industrial countries would increase by about 20 ppm between 1990 and 2010 if no emission reductions were assumed and by about 15 ppm in the considered rather strict reduction scenario. According to the Kyoto protocol the emissions from industrial countries should be reduced by 5.2% from the 1990 level in about 20 years. This development of the emissions would cause a concentration increase of 18 ppm. The concentration increase due to developing countries between 1990 and 2010 would be about 15 ppm. In order that the present global increase rate of CO2 concentration 1.5 ppm/a would not be exceeded, steeper reductions than those made in Kyoto should be agreed. Increasing global emissions and slow removal of CO2 from the atmosphere makes it difficult to reach the ultimate objective of the Climate Convention, the stabilisation of the atmospheric concentration.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)381-388
Number of pages8
JournalEnvironmental Science and Policy
Volume2
Issue number4-5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

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Kyoto Protocol
developing world
developing country
fossil fuel
United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change
atmosphere
carbon cycle
stabilization
greenhouse gas
UNO
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Cite this

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title = "Contribution of industrial and developing countries to the atmospheric CO2 concentrations : Impact of the Kyoto Protocol",
abstract = "The UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto protocol made under the Convention, aim at controlling the greenhouse gas emissions and their concentrations in the atmosphere. The contributions of fossil fuel use in industrial and developing countries to the atmospheric CO2 concentration are calculated using estimates for emission developments and a simple carbon cycle model. The contribution of the industrial countries to the CO2 concentration increase, above the preindustrial level, is estimated to be about 50 ppm in 1990 if only the emissions from fossil fuels are considered. The contribution from developing countries is about 15 ppm. The contribution from industrial countries would increase by about 20 ppm between 1990 and 2010 if no emission reductions were assumed and by about 15 ppm in the considered rather strict reduction scenario. According to the Kyoto protocol the emissions from industrial countries should be reduced by 5.2{\%} from the 1990 level in about 20 years. This development of the emissions would cause a concentration increase of 18 ppm. The concentration increase due to developing countries between 1990 and 2010 would be about 15 ppm. In order that the present global increase rate of CO2 concentration 1.5 ppm/a would not be exceeded, steeper reductions than those made in Kyoto should be agreed. Increasing global emissions and slow removal of CO2 from the atmosphere makes it difficult to reach the ultimate objective of the Climate Convention, the stabilisation of the atmospheric concentration.",
author = "Riitta Korhonen and Ilkka Savolainen",
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journal = "Environmental Science and Policy",
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Contribution of industrial and developing countries to the atmospheric CO2 concentrations  : Impact of the Kyoto Protocol. / Korhonen, Riitta (Corresponding Author); Savolainen, Ilkka.

In: Environmental Science and Policy, Vol. 2, No. 4-5, 1999, p. 381-388.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Contribution of industrial and developing countries to the atmospheric CO2 concentrations 

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AU - Korhonen, Riitta

AU - Savolainen, Ilkka

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N2 - The UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto protocol made under the Convention, aim at controlling the greenhouse gas emissions and their concentrations in the atmosphere. The contributions of fossil fuel use in industrial and developing countries to the atmospheric CO2 concentration are calculated using estimates for emission developments and a simple carbon cycle model. The contribution of the industrial countries to the CO2 concentration increase, above the preindustrial level, is estimated to be about 50 ppm in 1990 if only the emissions from fossil fuels are considered. The contribution from developing countries is about 15 ppm. The contribution from industrial countries would increase by about 20 ppm between 1990 and 2010 if no emission reductions were assumed and by about 15 ppm in the considered rather strict reduction scenario. According to the Kyoto protocol the emissions from industrial countries should be reduced by 5.2% from the 1990 level in about 20 years. This development of the emissions would cause a concentration increase of 18 ppm. The concentration increase due to developing countries between 1990 and 2010 would be about 15 ppm. In order that the present global increase rate of CO2 concentration 1.5 ppm/a would not be exceeded, steeper reductions than those made in Kyoto should be agreed. Increasing global emissions and slow removal of CO2 from the atmosphere makes it difficult to reach the ultimate objective of the Climate Convention, the stabilisation of the atmospheric concentration.

AB - The UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto protocol made under the Convention, aim at controlling the greenhouse gas emissions and their concentrations in the atmosphere. The contributions of fossil fuel use in industrial and developing countries to the atmospheric CO2 concentration are calculated using estimates for emission developments and a simple carbon cycle model. The contribution of the industrial countries to the CO2 concentration increase, above the preindustrial level, is estimated to be about 50 ppm in 1990 if only the emissions from fossil fuels are considered. The contribution from developing countries is about 15 ppm. The contribution from industrial countries would increase by about 20 ppm between 1990 and 2010 if no emission reductions were assumed and by about 15 ppm in the considered rather strict reduction scenario. According to the Kyoto protocol the emissions from industrial countries should be reduced by 5.2% from the 1990 level in about 20 years. This development of the emissions would cause a concentration increase of 18 ppm. The concentration increase due to developing countries between 1990 and 2010 would be about 15 ppm. In order that the present global increase rate of CO2 concentration 1.5 ppm/a would not be exceeded, steeper reductions than those made in Kyoto should be agreed. Increasing global emissions and slow removal of CO2 from the atmosphere makes it difficult to reach the ultimate objective of the Climate Convention, the stabilisation of the atmospheric concentration.

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