Cross-linking of sodium caseinate-structured emulsion with transglutaminase alters postprandial metabolic and appetite responses in healthy young individuals

Kristiina R. Juvonen (Corresponding Author), Adam Macierzanka, Martina E. Lille, David E. Laaksonen, Hannu M. Mykkänen, Leo K. Niskanen, Jussi Pihlajamäki, Kari A. Mäkelä, Clare E. N. Mills, Alan R. Mackie, Paul Malcolm, Karl-Heinz Herzig, Kaisa S. Poutanen, Leila J. Karhunen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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Abstract

The physico-chemical and interfacial properties of fat emulsions influence lipid digestion and may affect postprandial responses. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of the modification of the interfacial layer of a fat emulsion by cross-linking on postprandial metabolic and appetite responses. A total of fifteen healthy individuals (26·5 (sem 6·9) years and BMI 21·9 (sem 2·0) kg/m2) participated in a cross-over design experiment in which they consumed two isoenergetic (1924 kJ (460 kcal)) and isovolumic (250 g) emulsions stabilised with either sodium caseinate (Cas) or transglutaminase-cross-linked sodium caseinate (Cas-TG) in a randomised order. Blood samples were collected from the individuals at baseline and for 6 h postprandially for the determination of serum TAG and plasma NEFA, cholecystokinin (CCK), glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), glucose and insulin responses. Appetite was assessed using visual analogue scales. Postprandial TAG and NEFA responses and gastric emptying (GE) rates were comparable between the emulsions. CCK increased more after the ingestion of Cas-TG than after the ingestion of Cas (P< 0·05), while GLP-1 responses did not differ between the two test emulsions. Glucose and insulin profiles were lower after consuming Cas-TG than after consuming Cas (P< 0·05). The overall insulin, glucose and CCK responses, expressed as areas above/under the curve, did not differ significantly between the Cas and Cas-TG meal conditions. Satiety ratings were reduced and hunger, desire to eat and thirst ratings increased more after the ingestion of Cas-TG than after the ingestion of Cas (P<0·05). The present results suggest that even a subtle structural modification of the interfacial layer of a fat emulsion can alter the early postprandial profiles of glucose, insulin, CCK, appetite and satiety through decreased protein digestion without affecting significantly on GE or overall lipid digestion.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)418-429
JournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
Volume114
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fingerprint

Transglutaminases
Appetite
Caseins
Emulsions
Cholecystokinin
Eating
Insulin
Glucose
Glucagon-Like Peptide 1
Gastric Emptying
Fats
Nonesterified Fatty Acids
Digestion
Lipids
Thirst
Hunger
Visual Analog Scale
Cross-Over Studies
Proteolysis
Area Under Curve

Keywords

  • emulsion
  • cross-linking
  • transglutaminase
  • digestion
  • gastric emptying
  • satiety
  • gastrointestinal hormones

Cite this

Juvonen, Kristiina R. ; Macierzanka, Adam ; Lille, Martina E. ; Laaksonen, David E. ; Mykkänen, Hannu M. ; Niskanen, Leo K. ; Pihlajamäki, Jussi ; Mäkelä, Kari A. ; Mills, Clare E. N. ; Mackie, Alan R. ; Malcolm, Paul ; Herzig, Karl-Heinz ; Poutanen, Kaisa S. ; Karhunen, Leila J. / Cross-linking of sodium caseinate-structured emulsion with transglutaminase alters postprandial metabolic and appetite responses in healthy young individuals. In: British Journal of Nutrition. 2015 ; Vol. 114, No. 3. pp. 418-429.
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abstract = "The physico-chemical and interfacial properties of fat emulsions influence lipid digestion and may affect postprandial responses. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of the modification of the interfacial layer of a fat emulsion by cross-linking on postprandial metabolic and appetite responses. A total of fifteen healthy individuals (26·5 (sem 6·9) years and BMI 21·9 (sem 2·0) kg/m2) participated in a cross-over design experiment in which they consumed two isoenergetic (1924 kJ (460 kcal)) and isovolumic (250 g) emulsions stabilised with either sodium caseinate (Cas) or transglutaminase-cross-linked sodium caseinate (Cas-TG) in a randomised order. Blood samples were collected from the individuals at baseline and for 6 h postprandially for the determination of serum TAG and plasma NEFA, cholecystokinin (CCK), glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), glucose and insulin responses. Appetite was assessed using visual analogue scales. Postprandial TAG and NEFA responses and gastric emptying (GE) rates were comparable between the emulsions. CCK increased more after the ingestion of Cas-TG than after the ingestion of Cas (P< 0·05), while GLP-1 responses did not differ between the two test emulsions. Glucose and insulin profiles were lower after consuming Cas-TG than after consuming Cas (P< 0·05). The overall insulin, glucose and CCK responses, expressed as areas above/under the curve, did not differ significantly between the Cas and Cas-TG meal conditions. Satiety ratings were reduced and hunger, desire to eat and thirst ratings increased more after the ingestion of Cas-TG than after the ingestion of Cas (P<0·05). The present results suggest that even a subtle structural modification of the interfacial layer of a fat emulsion can alter the early postprandial profiles of glucose, insulin, CCK, appetite and satiety through decreased protein digestion without affecting significantly on GE or overall lipid digestion.",
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author = "Juvonen, {Kristiina R.} and Adam Macierzanka and Lille, {Martina E.} and Laaksonen, {David E.} and Mykk{\"a}nen, {Hannu M.} and Niskanen, {Leo K.} and Jussi Pihlajam{\"a}ki and M{\"a}kel{\"a}, {Kari A.} and Mills, {Clare E. N.} and Mackie, {Alan R.} and Paul Malcolm and Karl-Heinz Herzig and Poutanen, {Kaisa S.} and Karhunen, {Leila J.}",
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Juvonen, KR, Macierzanka, A, Lille, ME, Laaksonen, DE, Mykkänen, HM, Niskanen, LK, Pihlajamäki, J, Mäkelä, KA, Mills, CEN, Mackie, AR, Malcolm, P, Herzig, K-H, Poutanen, KS & Karhunen, LJ 2015, 'Cross-linking of sodium caseinate-structured emulsion with transglutaminase alters postprandial metabolic and appetite responses in healthy young individuals', British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 114, no. 3, pp. 418-429. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114515001737

Cross-linking of sodium caseinate-structured emulsion with transglutaminase alters postprandial metabolic and appetite responses in healthy young individuals. / Juvonen, Kristiina R. (Corresponding Author); Macierzanka, Adam; Lille, Martina E.; Laaksonen, David E.; Mykkänen, Hannu M.; Niskanen, Leo K.; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Mäkelä, Kari A.; Mills, Clare E. N.; Mackie, Alan R.; Malcolm, Paul; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Poutanen, Kaisa S.; Karhunen, Leila J.

In: British Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 114, No. 3, 2015, p. 418-429.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cross-linking of sodium caseinate-structured emulsion with transglutaminase alters postprandial metabolic and appetite responses in healthy young individuals

AU - Juvonen, Kristiina R.

AU - Macierzanka, Adam

AU - Lille, Martina E.

AU - Laaksonen, David E.

AU - Mykkänen, Hannu M.

AU - Niskanen, Leo K.

AU - Pihlajamäki, Jussi

AU - Mäkelä, Kari A.

AU - Mills, Clare E. N.

AU - Mackie, Alan R.

AU - Malcolm, Paul

AU - Herzig, Karl-Heinz

AU - Poutanen, Kaisa S.

AU - Karhunen, Leila J.

N1 - SDA: SHP: Bioeconomy Project code: 6749

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - The physico-chemical and interfacial properties of fat emulsions influence lipid digestion and may affect postprandial responses. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of the modification of the interfacial layer of a fat emulsion by cross-linking on postprandial metabolic and appetite responses. A total of fifteen healthy individuals (26·5 (sem 6·9) years and BMI 21·9 (sem 2·0) kg/m2) participated in a cross-over design experiment in which they consumed two isoenergetic (1924 kJ (460 kcal)) and isovolumic (250 g) emulsions stabilised with either sodium caseinate (Cas) or transglutaminase-cross-linked sodium caseinate (Cas-TG) in a randomised order. Blood samples were collected from the individuals at baseline and for 6 h postprandially for the determination of serum TAG and plasma NEFA, cholecystokinin (CCK), glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), glucose and insulin responses. Appetite was assessed using visual analogue scales. Postprandial TAG and NEFA responses and gastric emptying (GE) rates were comparable between the emulsions. CCK increased more after the ingestion of Cas-TG than after the ingestion of Cas (P< 0·05), while GLP-1 responses did not differ between the two test emulsions. Glucose and insulin profiles were lower after consuming Cas-TG than after consuming Cas (P< 0·05). The overall insulin, glucose and CCK responses, expressed as areas above/under the curve, did not differ significantly between the Cas and Cas-TG meal conditions. Satiety ratings were reduced and hunger, desire to eat and thirst ratings increased more after the ingestion of Cas-TG than after the ingestion of Cas (P<0·05). The present results suggest that even a subtle structural modification of the interfacial layer of a fat emulsion can alter the early postprandial profiles of glucose, insulin, CCK, appetite and satiety through decreased protein digestion without affecting significantly on GE or overall lipid digestion.

AB - The physico-chemical and interfacial properties of fat emulsions influence lipid digestion and may affect postprandial responses. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of the modification of the interfacial layer of a fat emulsion by cross-linking on postprandial metabolic and appetite responses. A total of fifteen healthy individuals (26·5 (sem 6·9) years and BMI 21·9 (sem 2·0) kg/m2) participated in a cross-over design experiment in which they consumed two isoenergetic (1924 kJ (460 kcal)) and isovolumic (250 g) emulsions stabilised with either sodium caseinate (Cas) or transglutaminase-cross-linked sodium caseinate (Cas-TG) in a randomised order. Blood samples were collected from the individuals at baseline and for 6 h postprandially for the determination of serum TAG and plasma NEFA, cholecystokinin (CCK), glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), glucose and insulin responses. Appetite was assessed using visual analogue scales. Postprandial TAG and NEFA responses and gastric emptying (GE) rates were comparable between the emulsions. CCK increased more after the ingestion of Cas-TG than after the ingestion of Cas (P< 0·05), while GLP-1 responses did not differ between the two test emulsions. Glucose and insulin profiles were lower after consuming Cas-TG than after consuming Cas (P< 0·05). The overall insulin, glucose and CCK responses, expressed as areas above/under the curve, did not differ significantly between the Cas and Cas-TG meal conditions. Satiety ratings were reduced and hunger, desire to eat and thirst ratings increased more after the ingestion of Cas-TG than after the ingestion of Cas (P<0·05). The present results suggest that even a subtle structural modification of the interfacial layer of a fat emulsion can alter the early postprandial profiles of glucose, insulin, CCK, appetite and satiety through decreased protein digestion without affecting significantly on GE or overall lipid digestion.

KW - emulsion

KW - cross-linking

KW - transglutaminase

KW - digestion

KW - gastric emptying

KW - satiety

KW - gastrointestinal hormones

U2 - 10.1017/S0007114515001737

DO - 10.1017/S0007114515001737

M3 - Article

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SP - 418

EP - 429

JO - British Journal of Nutrition

JF - British Journal of Nutrition

SN - 0007-1145

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ER -