Depth and profile control in plasma etched MEMS structures

Jyrki Kiihamäki (Corresponding Author), Hannu Kattelus, Jani Karttunen, Sami Franssila

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have achieved uniform etched depth regardless of feature size by employing a combination of anisotropic plasma etching in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) followed by wet etching. In our approach, the original feature is divided into small elementary features in a mosaic-like pattern. These individual small features are all the same size and thus exhibit identical etch rates and sidewall profiles. Final patterns are completed by wet etching: the ridges between the elementary features are removed in TMAH. In this paper, we present the results obtained using this dry/wet etching sequence. The benefits and limitations of this method are described. Extensions to more complex multidepth structures are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)234 - 238
Number of pages5
JournalSensors and Actuators A: Physical
Volume82
Issue number1-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

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Wet etching
microelectromechanical systems
MEMS
etching
Plasmas
profiles
Anisotropic etching
Dry etching
Plasma etching
Inductively coupled plasma
plasma etching
ridges

Cite this

Kiihamäki, Jyrki ; Kattelus, Hannu ; Karttunen, Jani ; Franssila, Sami. / Depth and profile control in plasma etched MEMS structures. In: Sensors and Actuators A: Physical. 2000 ; Vol. 82, No. 1-3. pp. 234 - 238.
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Depth and profile control in plasma etched MEMS structures. / Kiihamäki, Jyrki (Corresponding Author); Kattelus, Hannu; Karttunen, Jani; Franssila, Sami.

In: Sensors and Actuators A: Physical, Vol. 82, No. 1-3, 2000, p. 234 - 238.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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