Dietary Fiber from Oat and Rye Brans Ameliorate Western Diet–Induced Body Weight Gain and Hepatic Inflammation by the Modulation of Short-Chain Fatty Acids, Bile Acids, and Tryptophan Metabolism

Zuzanna Maria Kundi, Jetty Chung Yung Lee, Jussi Pihlajamäki, Chi Bun Chan, Kin Sum Leung, Stephanie Sik Yu So, Emilia Nordlund, Marjukka Kolehmainen (Corresponding Author), Hani El-Nezami

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Scope: Dietary fiber (DF) induces changes in gut microbiota function and thus modulates the gut environment. How this modulation is associated with metabolic pathways related to the gut is largely unclear. This study aims to investigate differences in metabolites produced by the gut microbiota and their interactions with host metabolism in response to supplementation with two bran fibers. Methods and Results: Male C57BL/6N mice are fed a western diet (WD) for 17 weeks. Two groups of mice received a diet enriched with 10% w/w of either oat or rye bran, with each bran containing 50% DF. Microbial metabolites are assessed by measuring cecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), ileal and fecal bile acids (BAs), and the expression of genes related to tryptophan (TRP) metabolism. Both brans lowered body weight gain and ameliorated WD-induced impaired glucose responses, hepatic inflammation, liver enzymes, and gut integrity markers associated with SCFA production, altered BA metabolism, and TRP diversion from the serotonin synthesis pathway to microbial indole production. Conclusions: Both brans develop a favorable environment in the gut by altering the composition of microbes and modulating produced metabolites. Changes induced in the gut environment by a fiber-enriched diet may explain the amelioration of metabolic disturbances related to WD.

Original languageEnglish
JournalMolecular Nutrition and Food Research
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 11 Jun 2020
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Keywords

  • dietary fiber
  • gut metabolism
  • microbial metabolites
  • obesity
  • prebiotics

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