Differing Mechanisms of New Particle Formation at Two Arctic Sites

Lisa J. Beck, Nina Sarnela, Heikki Junninen, Clara J.M. Hoppe, Olga Garmash, Federico Bianchi, Matthieu Riva, Clemence Rose, Otso Peräkylä, Daniela Wimmer, Oskari Kausiala, Tuija Jokinen, Lauri Ahonen, Jyri Mikkilä, Jani Hakala, Xu Cheng He, Jenni Kontkanen, Klara K.E. Wolf, David Cappelletti, Mauro MazzolaRita Traversi, Chiara Petroselli, Angelo P. Viola, Vito Vitale, Robert Lange, Andreas Massling, Jakob K. Nøjgaard, Radovan Krejci, Linn Karlsson, Paul Zieger, Sehyun Jang, Kitack Lee, Ville Vakkari, Janne Lampilahti, Roseline C. Thakur, Katri Leino, Juha Kangasluoma, Ella Maria Duplissy, Erkki Siivola, Marjan Marbouti, Yee Jun Tham, Alfonso Saiz-Lopez, Tuukka Petäjä, Mikael Ehn, Douglas R. Worsnop, Henrik Skov, Markku Kulmala, Veli Matti Kerminen, Mikko Sipilä

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

New particle formation in the Arctic atmosphere is an important source of aerosol particles. Understanding the processes of Arctic secondary aerosol formation is crucial due to their significant impact on cloud properties and therefore Arctic amplification. We observed the molecular formation of new particles from low-volatility vapors at two Arctic sites with differing surroundings. In Svalbard, sulfuric acid (SA) and methane sulfonic acid (MSA) contribute to the formation of secondary aerosol and to some extent to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). This occurs via ion-induced nucleation of SA and NH3 and subsequent growth by mainly SA and MSA condensation during springtime and highly oxygenated organic molecules during summertime. By contrast, in an ice-covered region around Villum, we observed new particle formation driven by iodic acid but its concentration was insufficient to grow nucleated particles to CCN sizes. Our results provide new insight about sources and precursors of Arctic secondary aerosol particles.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere2020GL091334
JournalGeophysical Research Letters
Volume48
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Feb 2021
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Keywords

  • Arctic atmosphere
  • low-volatility vapors
  • new particle formation

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