Driver assessment of road weather conditions and road weather information

Niina Sihvola

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference articleScientific

Abstract

This study investigated four issues relating to road weather conditions: (1) do the drivers receive forecast information, (2) do the drivers change their travel plans or driving behaviour because of road weather conditions, (3) how do drivers assess different road weather conditions, and (4) how do these assessments relate to weather forecasts? The data was collected via interviews at service stations and on the roadside. The road weather forecast class was poor or hazardous during 61% of the time the interviews were taking place. About 75% of respondents rated the road weather conditions to be poor or hazardous. Overall, 62% of drivers had received or looked for information on weather and road conditions before and/or during the trip, typically from radio or TV. Drivers were more likely to have acquired information on weather and road conditions than other drivers if they were less experienced, they had driven for a longer time before the interview or they were on a trip they did not make frequently. In comparison with the uninformed drivers, those who had looked for or received weather forecast rated the conditions as worse, the road surface more slippery and the accident risk higher. Every fifth respondent indicated that they had changed or considered changing the travel plans for their current trip because of the road weather conditions either before the trip or during the trip. The most frequently mentioned action was allocating more time to the trip. The results indicated that it is important to inform drivers about road weather conditions. The drivers’ estimations on the road surface friction level did not correspond to the information from road weather stations and the drivers had difficulties to assess the road weather conditions.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2009
EventYoung Researchers Seminar 2009 - Torino, Italy
Duration: 3 Jun 20095 Jun 2009

Conference

ConferenceYoung Researchers Seminar 2009
Abbreviated titleYRS
CountryItaly
CityTorino
Period3/06/095/06/09

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road
weather
weather condition
weather station
accident
friction
radio
forecast

Cite this

Sihvola, N. (2009). Driver assessment of road weather conditions and road weather information. Paper presented at Young Researchers Seminar 2009, Torino, Italy.
Sihvola, Niina. / Driver assessment of road weather conditions and road weather information. Paper presented at Young Researchers Seminar 2009, Torino, Italy.
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abstract = "This study investigated four issues relating to road weather conditions: (1) do the drivers receive forecast information, (2) do the drivers change their travel plans or driving behaviour because of road weather conditions, (3) how do drivers assess different road weather conditions, and (4) how do these assessments relate to weather forecasts? The data was collected via interviews at service stations and on the roadside. The road weather forecast class was poor or hazardous during 61{\%} of the time the interviews were taking place. About 75{\%} of respondents rated the road weather conditions to be poor or hazardous. Overall, 62{\%} of drivers had received or looked for information on weather and road conditions before and/or during the trip, typically from radio or TV. Drivers were more likely to have acquired information on weather and road conditions than other drivers if they were less experienced, they had driven for a longer time before the interview or they were on a trip they did not make frequently. In comparison with the uninformed drivers, those who had looked for or received weather forecast rated the conditions as worse, the road surface more slippery and the accident risk higher. Every fifth respondent indicated that they had changed or considered changing the travel plans for their current trip because of the road weather conditions either before the trip or during the trip. The most frequently mentioned action was allocating more time to the trip. The results indicated that it is important to inform drivers about road weather conditions. The drivers’ estimations on the road surface friction level did not correspond to the information from road weather stations and the drivers had difficulties to assess the road weather conditions.",
author = "Niina Sihvola",
note = "CA2: TK302; Young Researchers Seminar 2009, YRS ; Conference date: 03-06-2009 Through 05-06-2009",
year = "2009",
language = "English",

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Sihvola, N 2009, 'Driver assessment of road weather conditions and road weather information' Paper presented at Young Researchers Seminar 2009, Torino, Italy, 3/06/09 - 5/06/09, .

Driver assessment of road weather conditions and road weather information. / Sihvola, Niina.

2009. Paper presented at Young Researchers Seminar 2009, Torino, Italy.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference articleScientific

TY - CONF

T1 - Driver assessment of road weather conditions and road weather information

AU - Sihvola, Niina

N1 - CA2: TK302

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - This study investigated four issues relating to road weather conditions: (1) do the drivers receive forecast information, (2) do the drivers change their travel plans or driving behaviour because of road weather conditions, (3) how do drivers assess different road weather conditions, and (4) how do these assessments relate to weather forecasts? The data was collected via interviews at service stations and on the roadside. The road weather forecast class was poor or hazardous during 61% of the time the interviews were taking place. About 75% of respondents rated the road weather conditions to be poor or hazardous. Overall, 62% of drivers had received or looked for information on weather and road conditions before and/or during the trip, typically from radio or TV. Drivers were more likely to have acquired information on weather and road conditions than other drivers if they were less experienced, they had driven for a longer time before the interview or they were on a trip they did not make frequently. In comparison with the uninformed drivers, those who had looked for or received weather forecast rated the conditions as worse, the road surface more slippery and the accident risk higher. Every fifth respondent indicated that they had changed or considered changing the travel plans for their current trip because of the road weather conditions either before the trip or during the trip. The most frequently mentioned action was allocating more time to the trip. The results indicated that it is important to inform drivers about road weather conditions. The drivers’ estimations on the road surface friction level did not correspond to the information from road weather stations and the drivers had difficulties to assess the road weather conditions.

AB - This study investigated four issues relating to road weather conditions: (1) do the drivers receive forecast information, (2) do the drivers change their travel plans or driving behaviour because of road weather conditions, (3) how do drivers assess different road weather conditions, and (4) how do these assessments relate to weather forecasts? The data was collected via interviews at service stations and on the roadside. The road weather forecast class was poor or hazardous during 61% of the time the interviews were taking place. About 75% of respondents rated the road weather conditions to be poor or hazardous. Overall, 62% of drivers had received or looked for information on weather and road conditions before and/or during the trip, typically from radio or TV. Drivers were more likely to have acquired information on weather and road conditions than other drivers if they were less experienced, they had driven for a longer time before the interview or they were on a trip they did not make frequently. In comparison with the uninformed drivers, those who had looked for or received weather forecast rated the conditions as worse, the road surface more slippery and the accident risk higher. Every fifth respondent indicated that they had changed or considered changing the travel plans for their current trip because of the road weather conditions either before the trip or during the trip. The most frequently mentioned action was allocating more time to the trip. The results indicated that it is important to inform drivers about road weather conditions. The drivers’ estimations on the road surface friction level did not correspond to the information from road weather stations and the drivers had difficulties to assess the road weather conditions.

M3 - Conference article

ER -

Sihvola N. Driver assessment of road weather conditions and road weather information. 2009. Paper presented at Young Researchers Seminar 2009, Torino, Italy.