Ductility requirements for structural details with stress concentration and diffuse necking

Petr Hradil, Ludovic Fulop, Asko Talja, Petri Ongelin

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference article in proceedingsScientificpeer-review

    Abstract

    Structural steels need to demonstrate certain ductility in order to be used in build-ings design. Fulfilling these criteria of design codes may be difficult especially for new high-strength steels where ductile fracture of tensile coupons appears at relatively low deformation. The goal of our study is to develop a calculation method of alternative ductility limits for structural details in a particular design situation. Such limits might be less demanding. Appli-cation of the method to a large variety of material models resulted in a simple criterion for the standard coupon test, the minimum distance between the uniform elongation and the coupon failure. This distance is called "necking capacity" of a tensile coupon in our paper.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the International Colloquium on Stability and Ductility of Steel Structures
    Place of PublicationTimişoara
    Pages493-500
    Publication statusPublished - 2016
    MoE publication typeA4 Article in a conference publication
    EventInternational Colloquium on Stability and Ductility of Steel Structures, SDSS 2016 - Timisoara, Romania
    Duration: 30 May 20161 Jun 2016

    Conference

    ConferenceInternational Colloquium on Stability and Ductility of Steel Structures, SDSS 2016
    Abbreviated titleSDSS 2016
    CountryRomania
    CityTimisoara
    Period30/05/161/06/16

    Keywords

    • building materials
    • ductile fracture
    • ductility
    • steel structures
    • structural design
    • design situations
    • ductility requirement
    • low deformations
    • material models
    • minimum distance
    • structural details
    • structural steels
    • uniform elongation

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Ductility requirements for structural details with stress concentration and diffuse necking'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this