Effect of commercial marinades on the mutagenic activity, sensory quality and amount of heterocyclic amines in chicken grilled under different conditions

Leena Tikkanen, Kyösti Latva-Kala, Raija-Liisa Heiniö

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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Abstract

The effect of processing conditions on the mutagenic activity and sensory quality of everyday food was studied by investigating grilled chicken samples seasoned with four different marinades and grilled at temperatures of about 110, 170 and 220 degrees C. The amounts of the heterocyclic amines 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5,-b]pyridine were determined only in samples grilled at 220 degrees C, using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technique with negative-ion chemical ionization. Sensory quality was determined using the extended ranking test method and the mutagenic activity using the Ames Salmonella assay. At 220 degrees C one of the marinades decreased the mutagenic activity in the chicken samples compared with the unseasoned control or samples treated with the other marinades. Great variations, without any clear correlation with mutagenicity, were observed in the amounts of heterocyclic amines between chicken samples treated with the same or different marinades. At the grilling temperatures of 170 degrees C and 110 degrees C the mutagenic activities of the chicken samples were lower or they were non-mutagenic. There was no correlation between mutagenic activity and sensory quality of the products. The samples with high mutagenic activity were ranked to be as good as the samples with lower or no mutagenicity. The results show that it is possible to prepare grilled products with reduced mutagenicity without compromising their sensory quality. It was also evident that marinades can have a reducing effect on the mutagenicity of grilled chicken. Variation observed in the amounts of heterocyclic amines between equivalent products makes it difficult to estimate their concentration in everyday foods.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)725-730
Number of pages6
JournalFood and Chemical Toxicology
Volume34
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1996
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fingerprint

heterocyclic amines
marinating
Amines
Chickens
2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo(4,5-f)quinoxaline
chickens
mutagenicity
Salmonella
quinoxalines
sampling
Gas chromatography
Ionization
Mass spectrometry
Assays
Negative ions
Food Quality
Temperature
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
grilling
Processing

Cite this

@article{20922d5170504622947f4f166a84cf62,
title = "Effect of commercial marinades on the mutagenic activity, sensory quality and amount of heterocyclic amines in chicken grilled under different conditions",
abstract = "The effect of processing conditions on the mutagenic activity and sensory quality of everyday food was studied by investigating grilled chicken samples seasoned with four different marinades and grilled at temperatures of about 110, 170 and 220 degrees C. The amounts of the heterocyclic amines 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5,-b]pyridine were determined only in samples grilled at 220 degrees C, using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technique with negative-ion chemical ionization. Sensory quality was determined using the extended ranking test method and the mutagenic activity using the Ames Salmonella assay. At 220 degrees C one of the marinades decreased the mutagenic activity in the chicken samples compared with the unseasoned control or samples treated with the other marinades. Great variations, without any clear correlation with mutagenicity, were observed in the amounts of heterocyclic amines between chicken samples treated with the same or different marinades. At the grilling temperatures of 170 degrees C and 110 degrees C the mutagenic activities of the chicken samples were lower or they were non-mutagenic. There was no correlation between mutagenic activity and sensory quality of the products. The samples with high mutagenic activity were ranked to be as good as the samples with lower or no mutagenicity. The results show that it is possible to prepare grilled products with reduced mutagenicity without compromising their sensory quality. It was also evident that marinades can have a reducing effect on the mutagenicity of grilled chicken. Variation observed in the amounts of heterocyclic amines between equivalent products makes it difficult to estimate their concentration in everyday foods.",
author = "Leena Tikkanen and Ky{\"o}sti Latva-Kala and Raija-Liisa Heini{\"o}",
note = "Project code: BEL32024",
year = "1996",
doi = "10.1016/0278-6915(96)00036-1",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "725--730",
journal = "Food and Chemical Toxicology",
issn = "0278-6915",
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Effect of commercial marinades on the mutagenic activity, sensory quality and amount of heterocyclic amines in chicken grilled under different conditions. / Tikkanen, Leena; Latva-Kala, Kyösti; Heiniö, Raija-Liisa.

In: Food and Chemical Toxicology, Vol. 34, No. 8, 1996, p. 725-730.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of commercial marinades on the mutagenic activity, sensory quality and amount of heterocyclic amines in chicken grilled under different conditions

AU - Tikkanen, Leena

AU - Latva-Kala, Kyösti

AU - Heiniö, Raija-Liisa

N1 - Project code: BEL32024

PY - 1996

Y1 - 1996

N2 - The effect of processing conditions on the mutagenic activity and sensory quality of everyday food was studied by investigating grilled chicken samples seasoned with four different marinades and grilled at temperatures of about 110, 170 and 220 degrees C. The amounts of the heterocyclic amines 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5,-b]pyridine were determined only in samples grilled at 220 degrees C, using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technique with negative-ion chemical ionization. Sensory quality was determined using the extended ranking test method and the mutagenic activity using the Ames Salmonella assay. At 220 degrees C one of the marinades decreased the mutagenic activity in the chicken samples compared with the unseasoned control or samples treated with the other marinades. Great variations, without any clear correlation with mutagenicity, were observed in the amounts of heterocyclic amines between chicken samples treated with the same or different marinades. At the grilling temperatures of 170 degrees C and 110 degrees C the mutagenic activities of the chicken samples were lower or they were non-mutagenic. There was no correlation between mutagenic activity and sensory quality of the products. The samples with high mutagenic activity were ranked to be as good as the samples with lower or no mutagenicity. The results show that it is possible to prepare grilled products with reduced mutagenicity without compromising their sensory quality. It was also evident that marinades can have a reducing effect on the mutagenicity of grilled chicken. Variation observed in the amounts of heterocyclic amines between equivalent products makes it difficult to estimate their concentration in everyday foods.

AB - The effect of processing conditions on the mutagenic activity and sensory quality of everyday food was studied by investigating grilled chicken samples seasoned with four different marinades and grilled at temperatures of about 110, 170 and 220 degrees C. The amounts of the heterocyclic amines 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5,-b]pyridine were determined only in samples grilled at 220 degrees C, using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technique with negative-ion chemical ionization. Sensory quality was determined using the extended ranking test method and the mutagenic activity using the Ames Salmonella assay. At 220 degrees C one of the marinades decreased the mutagenic activity in the chicken samples compared with the unseasoned control or samples treated with the other marinades. Great variations, without any clear correlation with mutagenicity, were observed in the amounts of heterocyclic amines between chicken samples treated with the same or different marinades. At the grilling temperatures of 170 degrees C and 110 degrees C the mutagenic activities of the chicken samples were lower or they were non-mutagenic. There was no correlation between mutagenic activity and sensory quality of the products. The samples with high mutagenic activity were ranked to be as good as the samples with lower or no mutagenicity. The results show that it is possible to prepare grilled products with reduced mutagenicity without compromising their sensory quality. It was also evident that marinades can have a reducing effect on the mutagenicity of grilled chicken. Variation observed in the amounts of heterocyclic amines between equivalent products makes it difficult to estimate their concentration in everyday foods.

U2 - 10.1016/0278-6915(96)00036-1

DO - 10.1016/0278-6915(96)00036-1

M3 - Article

VL - 34

SP - 725

EP - 730

JO - Food and Chemical Toxicology

JF - Food and Chemical Toxicology

SN - 0278-6915

IS - 8

ER -