Effect of high pressure treatment on cell wall polysaccharides of berries

H. Hilz, Martina Lille, H. A. Schols, Kaisa Poutanen, A. G. J. Voragen

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference articleScientific

Abstract

High-pressure processing (HPP) is one of the prosperous techniques in food processing. Under HPP the activities and specificities of different cell wall affecting enzymes change [1]. In juice production cell wall degrading enzymes are used to soften the tissue and destroy a highly viscous pectin gel, which is formed after mechanical mashing of the berries. Thus, cell wall polysaccharides are key compounds for producing juice in higher yields and reduction of press cake quantities. The structure of cell wall polysaccharides is hardly affected by HPP directly, but the treatment might lead to improved enzyme control, giving a benefit for yield and colour of the juice. This is exemplified by Krebbers et al. [1] for two endogenous pectic enzymes affecting the viscosity of the mashed berries. They found a six fold higher activity of pectin methyl esterase after HPP of tomatoes, while the activity of polygalacturonase decreased by 70 %. The first step to show the influence of HPP on enzymatic activity was to analyse cell wall polysaccharides. Mechanically mashed bilberries and black currants were mechanically mashed and treated with 400 MPa at 32 – 43 °C for 15 min. Part of this mash was processed to juice. Cell wall polysaccharides were isolated from the mash, the juice, and the remaining press cake and analysed. The effect of HPP is shown by comparing the obtained data with the data from fresh berries and from juice and press cake of conventional processing [2]. This presentation shows how HPP affects the structure of cell wall polysaccharides. Consequences of the use of enzymatic activity and specificity (endogenous and exogenous) before and after HPP will be discussed. REFERENCES: 1. Krebbers, B., Matser, A.M., Hoogerwerf, S.W., Moezelaar, R., Tomassen, M.M.M., and Van den Berg, R.W., IFSET, 4(4), 377-385 (2003). 2. Hilz, H., Bakx, E.J., Schols, H.A., and Voragen, A.G.J., Carbohydr. Polym., submitted (2004).
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2004
Event2nd International Conference on Biocatalysis of Food and Drinks - Stuttgart, Germany
Duration: 19 Sep 200422 Sep 2004

Conference

Conference2nd International Conference on Biocatalysis of Food and Drinks
CountryGermany
CityStuttgart
Period19/09/0422/09/04

Fingerprint

high pressure treatment
small fruits
polysaccharides
cell walls
juices
oilseed cakes
mash
enzymes
mashing
bilberries
black currants
pectinesterase
polygalacturonase
food processing
pectins
viscosity
gels
tomatoes
color

Cite this

Hilz, H., Lille, M., Schols, H. A., Poutanen, K., & Voragen, A. G. J. (2004). Effect of high pressure treatment on cell wall polysaccharides of berries. Paper presented at 2nd International Conference on Biocatalysis of Food and Drinks, Stuttgart, Germany.
Hilz, H. ; Lille, Martina ; Schols, H. A. ; Poutanen, Kaisa ; Voragen, A. G. J. / Effect of high pressure treatment on cell wall polysaccharides of berries. Paper presented at 2nd International Conference on Biocatalysis of Food and Drinks, Stuttgart, Germany.
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title = "Effect of high pressure treatment on cell wall polysaccharides of berries",
abstract = "High-pressure processing (HPP) is one of the prosperous techniques in food processing. Under HPP the activities and specificities of different cell wall affecting enzymes change [1]. In juice production cell wall degrading enzymes are used to soften the tissue and destroy a highly viscous pectin gel, which is formed after mechanical mashing of the berries. Thus, cell wall polysaccharides are key compounds for producing juice in higher yields and reduction of press cake quantities. The structure of cell wall polysaccharides is hardly affected by HPP directly, but the treatment might lead to improved enzyme control, giving a benefit for yield and colour of the juice. This is exemplified by Krebbers et al. [1] for two endogenous pectic enzymes affecting the viscosity of the mashed berries. They found a six fold higher activity of pectin methyl esterase after HPP of tomatoes, while the activity of polygalacturonase decreased by 70 {\%}. The first step to show the influence of HPP on enzymatic activity was to analyse cell wall polysaccharides. Mechanically mashed bilberries and black currants were mechanically mashed and treated with 400 MPa at 32 – 43 °C for 15 min. Part of this mash was processed to juice. Cell wall polysaccharides were isolated from the mash, the juice, and the remaining press cake and analysed. The effect of HPP is shown by comparing the obtained data with the data from fresh berries and from juice and press cake of conventional processing [2]. This presentation shows how HPP affects the structure of cell wall polysaccharides. Consequences of the use of enzymatic activity and specificity (endogenous and exogenous) before and after HPP will be discussed. REFERENCES: 1. Krebbers, B., Matser, A.M., Hoogerwerf, S.W., Moezelaar, R., Tomassen, M.M.M., and Van den Berg, R.W., IFSET, 4(4), 377-385 (2003). 2. Hilz, H., Bakx, E.J., Schols, H.A., and Voragen, A.G.J., Carbohydr. Polym., submitted (2004).",
author = "H. Hilz and Martina Lille and Schols, {H. A.} and Kaisa Poutanen and Voragen, {A. G. J.}",
year = "2004",
language = "English",
note = "2nd International Conference on Biocatalysis of Food and Drinks ; Conference date: 19-09-2004 Through 22-09-2004",

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Hilz, H, Lille, M, Schols, HA, Poutanen, K & Voragen, AGJ 2004, 'Effect of high pressure treatment on cell wall polysaccharides of berries' Paper presented at 2nd International Conference on Biocatalysis of Food and Drinks, Stuttgart, Germany, 19/09/04 - 22/09/04, .

Effect of high pressure treatment on cell wall polysaccharides of berries. / Hilz, H.; Lille, Martina; Schols, H. A.; Poutanen, Kaisa; Voragen, A. G. J.

2004. Paper presented at 2nd International Conference on Biocatalysis of Food and Drinks, Stuttgart, Germany.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference articleScientific

TY - CONF

T1 - Effect of high pressure treatment on cell wall polysaccharides of berries

AU - Hilz, H.

AU - Lille, Martina

AU - Schols, H. A.

AU - Poutanen, Kaisa

AU - Voragen, A. G. J.

PY - 2004

Y1 - 2004

N2 - High-pressure processing (HPP) is one of the prosperous techniques in food processing. Under HPP the activities and specificities of different cell wall affecting enzymes change [1]. In juice production cell wall degrading enzymes are used to soften the tissue and destroy a highly viscous pectin gel, which is formed after mechanical mashing of the berries. Thus, cell wall polysaccharides are key compounds for producing juice in higher yields and reduction of press cake quantities. The structure of cell wall polysaccharides is hardly affected by HPP directly, but the treatment might lead to improved enzyme control, giving a benefit for yield and colour of the juice. This is exemplified by Krebbers et al. [1] for two endogenous pectic enzymes affecting the viscosity of the mashed berries. They found a six fold higher activity of pectin methyl esterase after HPP of tomatoes, while the activity of polygalacturonase decreased by 70 %. The first step to show the influence of HPP on enzymatic activity was to analyse cell wall polysaccharides. Mechanically mashed bilberries and black currants were mechanically mashed and treated with 400 MPa at 32 – 43 °C for 15 min. Part of this mash was processed to juice. Cell wall polysaccharides were isolated from the mash, the juice, and the remaining press cake and analysed. The effect of HPP is shown by comparing the obtained data with the data from fresh berries and from juice and press cake of conventional processing [2]. This presentation shows how HPP affects the structure of cell wall polysaccharides. Consequences of the use of enzymatic activity and specificity (endogenous and exogenous) before and after HPP will be discussed. REFERENCES: 1. Krebbers, B., Matser, A.M., Hoogerwerf, S.W., Moezelaar, R., Tomassen, M.M.M., and Van den Berg, R.W., IFSET, 4(4), 377-385 (2003). 2. Hilz, H., Bakx, E.J., Schols, H.A., and Voragen, A.G.J., Carbohydr. Polym., submitted (2004).

AB - High-pressure processing (HPP) is one of the prosperous techniques in food processing. Under HPP the activities and specificities of different cell wall affecting enzymes change [1]. In juice production cell wall degrading enzymes are used to soften the tissue and destroy a highly viscous pectin gel, which is formed after mechanical mashing of the berries. Thus, cell wall polysaccharides are key compounds for producing juice in higher yields and reduction of press cake quantities. The structure of cell wall polysaccharides is hardly affected by HPP directly, but the treatment might lead to improved enzyme control, giving a benefit for yield and colour of the juice. This is exemplified by Krebbers et al. [1] for two endogenous pectic enzymes affecting the viscosity of the mashed berries. They found a six fold higher activity of pectin methyl esterase after HPP of tomatoes, while the activity of polygalacturonase decreased by 70 %. The first step to show the influence of HPP on enzymatic activity was to analyse cell wall polysaccharides. Mechanically mashed bilberries and black currants were mechanically mashed and treated with 400 MPa at 32 – 43 °C for 15 min. Part of this mash was processed to juice. Cell wall polysaccharides were isolated from the mash, the juice, and the remaining press cake and analysed. The effect of HPP is shown by comparing the obtained data with the data from fresh berries and from juice and press cake of conventional processing [2]. This presentation shows how HPP affects the structure of cell wall polysaccharides. Consequences of the use of enzymatic activity and specificity (endogenous and exogenous) before and after HPP will be discussed. REFERENCES: 1. Krebbers, B., Matser, A.M., Hoogerwerf, S.W., Moezelaar, R., Tomassen, M.M.M., and Van den Berg, R.W., IFSET, 4(4), 377-385 (2003). 2. Hilz, H., Bakx, E.J., Schols, H.A., and Voragen, A.G.J., Carbohydr. Polym., submitted (2004).

M3 - Conference article

ER -

Hilz H, Lille M, Schols HA, Poutanen K, Voragen AGJ. Effect of high pressure treatment on cell wall polysaccharides of berries. 2004. Paper presented at 2nd International Conference on Biocatalysis of Food and Drinks, Stuttgart, Germany.