Effect of inoculant application rate and potassium sorbate on fermentation quality and aerobic stability of wilted grass silages

Eeva Saarisalo, Seija Jaakkola, Anu Vaari, Eija Skyttä

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference article in proceedingsScientific

Abstract

Wilted first cut timothy meadow fescue grass (DM 298 g/kg) was ensiled into pilot scale silos (3 kg) for 110 days in three replicates. Eight treatments were 1) Untreated (UT), 2) Formic acid based additive 5 1/t (FA), 3-5) Lactobacillus plantarum VTT E-78076 (E76) at three levels: 1*105 cfu/g, 5*105 cfu/g. E76 1*106 cfu/g, and 6-8) the three levels of E76 in combination with 0.30 g/kg K-sorbate. Fermentation quality of the silages was analysed and aerobic stability measured. All inoculants improved fermentation quality compared to untreated silage. Increase in inoculation rate resulted in a small increase in WSC and decreased amounts of ethanol and ammonia-N. K-sorbate had a negligible effect on fermentation quality while it improved aerobic stability especially with the highest E76 level.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication11th International Scientific Symposium Forage Conservation
Subtitle of host publicationNitra, Slovak Republic, 9-11 September 2003
PublisherResearch Institute of Animal Production
Pages92-93
ISBN (Print)978-80-88872-31-3
Publication statusPublished - 2003
MoE publication typeB3 Non-refereed article in conference proceedings

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    Saarisalo, E., Jaakkola, S., Vaari, A., & Skyttä, E. (2003). Effect of inoculant application rate and potassium sorbate on fermentation quality and aerobic stability of wilted grass silages. In 11th International Scientific Symposium Forage Conservation: Nitra, Slovak Republic, 9-11 September 2003 (pp. 92-93). Research Institute of Animal Production.