Electrical transport through ordered self-assembled protein monolayer measured by constant force conductive atomic force microscopy

Jani Kivioja (Corresponding Author), Katri Kurppa, Markku Kainlauri, Markus Linder, Jouni Ahopelto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper addresses some of the challenges met in electrical characterization of biomolecules, namely, the control of the orientation of molecules and the control of the force exerted on these soft molecules. We investigate the transport properties of small proteins called hydrophobins using conductive atomic force microscopy. The proteins have a property that they form a well ordered monolayer in which the orientation of the molecules is known. We introduce an active compensation for the electrostatic force induced by the bias voltage, which often hamper the measurements. Results suggest that the electrical transport through the hydrophobins protein monolayer occurs mainly via tunneling.
Original languageEnglish
Article number183901
JournalApplied Physics Letters
Volume94
Issue number18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

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atomic force microscopy
proteins
molecules
transport properties
electrostatics
electric potential

Keywords

  • electrical characterization
  • biomolecules
  • hydrophobin monolayer
  • hydrophobins

Cite this

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title = "Electrical transport through ordered self-assembled protein monolayer measured by constant force conductive atomic force microscopy",
abstract = "This paper addresses some of the challenges met in electrical characterization of biomolecules, namely, the control of the orientation of molecules and the control of the force exerted on these soft molecules. We investigate the transport properties of small proteins called hydrophobins using conductive atomic force microscopy. The proteins have a property that they form a well ordered monolayer in which the orientation of the molecules is known. We introduce an active compensation for the electrostatic force induced by the bias voltage, which often hamper the measurements. Results suggest that the electrical transport through the hydrophobins protein monolayer occurs mainly via tunneling.",
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Electrical transport through ordered self-assembled protein monolayer measured by constant force conductive atomic force microscopy. / Kivioja, Jani (Corresponding Author); Kurppa, Katri; Kainlauri, Markku; Linder, Markus; Ahopelto, Jouni.

In: Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 94, No. 18, 183901, 2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Electrical transport through ordered self-assembled protein monolayer measured by constant force conductive atomic force microscopy

AU - Kivioja, Jani

AU - Kurppa, Katri

AU - Kainlauri, Markku

AU - Linder, Markus

AU - Ahopelto, Jouni

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - This paper addresses some of the challenges met in electrical characterization of biomolecules, namely, the control of the orientation of molecules and the control of the force exerted on these soft molecules. We investigate the transport properties of small proteins called hydrophobins using conductive atomic force microscopy. The proteins have a property that they form a well ordered monolayer in which the orientation of the molecules is known. We introduce an active compensation for the electrostatic force induced by the bias voltage, which often hamper the measurements. Results suggest that the electrical transport through the hydrophobins protein monolayer occurs mainly via tunneling.

AB - This paper addresses some of the challenges met in electrical characterization of biomolecules, namely, the control of the orientation of molecules and the control of the force exerted on these soft molecules. We investigate the transport properties of small proteins called hydrophobins using conductive atomic force microscopy. The proteins have a property that they form a well ordered monolayer in which the orientation of the molecules is known. We introduce an active compensation for the electrostatic force induced by the bias voltage, which often hamper the measurements. Results suggest that the electrical transport through the hydrophobins protein monolayer occurs mainly via tunneling.

KW - electrical characterization

KW - biomolecules

KW - hydrophobin monolayer

KW - hydrophobins

U2 - 10.1063/1.3126448

DO - 10.1063/1.3126448

M3 - Article

VL - 94

JO - Applied Physics Letters

JF - Applied Physics Letters

SN - 0003-6951

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