Energy consumption evaluation of H.264 and HEVC video encoders in high-resolution live streaming

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference article in proceedingsScientificpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Green computing and energy efficiency has become an important issue in today's rapidly growing multimedia transmission. Meanwhile users want high-quality content to be viewed anywhere, content producers must think alternatives for cutting expenses in the server. Usually multiple sub-streams from the original video feed are needed for clients with unique device characteristics, which can notably load the video encoding server leading also to increased energy consumption. Furthermore, social sharing applications using live video streaming can consume battery notably, which also drives developing energy-efficient video coding solutions. Therefore, it is essential to find ways for optimizing and selecting the proper tools for energy-efficient content production already in the server. In this paper, we evaluate the energy and power consumption for the existing top-rated open source video encoders in proportion to video quality and bit rate. The selected video coding formats include current dominant H.264 Advanced Video Coding (H.264/AVC), latest standard High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) and Google's royalty free VP9. The results show that the selected H.264 encoder (x264) has the lowest energy consumption, but the worst compression efficiency. On the contrast, x265 for HEVC has the best compression efficiency, but suffers from increased energy consumption. For our experiments, VP9 provides the best trade-off between compression efficiency and energy consumption.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationWireless and Mobile Computing, Networking and Communications (WiMob), 2016 IEEE 12th International Conference on
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers IEEE
Pages1-7
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-5090-0724-0
ISBN (Print)978-1-5090-0725-7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Dec 2016
MoE publication typeA4 Article in a conference publication
EventIEEE 12th International Conference on Wireless and Mobile Computing, Networking and Communications, WiMob 2016 - New York, United States
Duration: 17 Oct 201619 Oct 2016
Conference number: 12

Conference

ConferenceIEEE 12th International Conference on Wireless and Mobile Computing, Networking and Communications, WiMob 2016
Abbreviated titleWiMob 2016
CountryUnited States
CityNew York
Period17/10/1619/10/16

Fingerprint

Image coding
Energy utilization
Servers
Video streaming
Energy efficiency
Electric power utilization
Experiments

Keywords

  • video encoding
  • energy consumption
  • power consumption
  • H.264
  • HEVC
  • VP9

Cite this

Uitto, M. (2016). Energy consumption evaluation of H.264 and HEVC video encoders in high-resolution live streaming. In Wireless and Mobile Computing, Networking and Communications (WiMob), 2016 IEEE 12th International Conference on (pp. 1-7). Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers IEEE. https://doi.org/10.1109/WiMOB.2016.7763234
Uitto, Mikko. / Energy consumption evaluation of H.264 and HEVC video encoders in high-resolution live streaming. Wireless and Mobile Computing, Networking and Communications (WiMob), 2016 IEEE 12th International Conference on. Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers IEEE, 2016. pp. 1-7
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abstract = "Green computing and energy efficiency has become an important issue in today's rapidly growing multimedia transmission. Meanwhile users want high-quality content to be viewed anywhere, content producers must think alternatives for cutting expenses in the server. Usually multiple sub-streams from the original video feed are needed for clients with unique device characteristics, which can notably load the video encoding server leading also to increased energy consumption. Furthermore, social sharing applications using live video streaming can consume battery notably, which also drives developing energy-efficient video coding solutions. Therefore, it is essential to find ways for optimizing and selecting the proper tools for energy-efficient content production already in the server. In this paper, we evaluate the energy and power consumption for the existing top-rated open source video encoders in proportion to video quality and bit rate. The selected video coding formats include current dominant H.264 Advanced Video Coding (H.264/AVC), latest standard High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) and Google's royalty free VP9. The results show that the selected H.264 encoder (x264) has the lowest energy consumption, but the worst compression efficiency. On the contrast, x265 for HEVC has the best compression efficiency, but suffers from increased energy consumption. For our experiments, VP9 provides the best trade-off between compression efficiency and energy consumption.",
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Uitto, M 2016, Energy consumption evaluation of H.264 and HEVC video encoders in high-resolution live streaming. in Wireless and Mobile Computing, Networking and Communications (WiMob), 2016 IEEE 12th International Conference on. Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers IEEE, pp. 1-7, IEEE 12th International Conference on Wireless and Mobile Computing, Networking and Communications, WiMob 2016, New York, United States, 17/10/16. https://doi.org/10.1109/WiMOB.2016.7763234

Energy consumption evaluation of H.264 and HEVC video encoders in high-resolution live streaming. / Uitto, Mikko.

Wireless and Mobile Computing, Networking and Communications (WiMob), 2016 IEEE 12th International Conference on. Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers IEEE, 2016. p. 1-7.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference article in proceedingsScientificpeer-review

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Uitto M. Energy consumption evaluation of H.264 and HEVC video encoders in high-resolution live streaming. In Wireless and Mobile Computing, Networking and Communications (WiMob), 2016 IEEE 12th International Conference on. Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers IEEE. 2016. p. 1-7 https://doi.org/10.1109/WiMOB.2016.7763234