Entropy and the cost of complexity in industrial production

Johansson Allan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

The building of an industrial society can be viewed as a process of self-organisation with a decrease in entropy in society and a corresponding increase of entropy through dissipation of energy into the environment.
The process is driven by the “degradation” of high quality energy to low-quality heat as energy flows down potential gradients at the same time creating a favourable potential gradient driving the reaction.
The post-industrial society is characterised by an increase in complexity, which can be monitored by the exergy consumption. Here a first attempt is made to relate the complexity of a number of products, as represented by the number of their functional parts, to their actual economic value.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)295-299
JournalExergy
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fingerprint

potential gradients
entropy
costs
exergy
economics
energy
dissipation
degradation
heat
products

Keywords

  • socioeconomic impacts
  • entropy
  • complexity
  • industrial ecosystem
  • sustainable development

Cite this

Allan, Johansson. / Entropy and the cost of complexity in industrial production. In: Exergy. 2002 ; Vol. 2, No. 4. pp. 295-299.
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Entropy and the cost of complexity in industrial production. / Allan, Johansson.

In: Exergy, Vol. 2, No. 4, 2002, p. 295-299.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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