Envisioning e-Justice for Criminal Justice Chain in Finland

Iina Aaltonen, Jari Laarni, Karo Tammela

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    Abstract

    The purpose of this paper is to envision new ways of working in the justice sector and to present the best practices and lessons learned in current e-justice in Finland. In 2011, Finnish prosecutors, district and appellate court judges and other court staff were interviewed and engaged in a workshop to envision ICT-supported workflow for resolving criminal cases. The three-stage anticipation dialogue workshop envisioned new ways of working in 2015, the challenges in the 4-year time span preceding it, and finally the possibilities of advanced technology. Workshop participants were relatively cautious with their visions, which clearly indicated that advanced technology as such is no solution. They considered interlinked and well-structured electronic documents with online access for all parties as enablers for working e-justice. Working with electronic documents requires accessory displays, cabling and power outlets for laptops as well as wireless networks. Scheduling - a timeconsuming secondary task - could be facilitated by shared electronic calendars with court room booking capabilities. Remote hearing and videoconferencing were anticipated to play a larger role in the future. Throughout the workshop, the importance of user-friendly information systems was emphasized. Even though the core task of practicing law was expected to remain the same, new technology requires a change in work practices. Adopting new ways of working can be challenging, and in addition to correctly-timed and well-targeted training, employees will also need support from their superiors.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)56-66
    JournalThe Electronic Journal of e-Government
    Volume13
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - 2015
    MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

    Fingerprint

    Finland
    justice
    electronics
    appellate court
    district court
    workflow
    scheduling
    best practice
    new technology
    information system
    dialogue
    employee
    staff
    Law

    Keywords

    • e-justice
    • criminal justice chain
    • case management systems
    • court room
    • work practice

    Cite this

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    Envisioning e-Justice for Criminal Justice Chain in Finland. / Aaltonen, Iina; Laarni, Jari; Tammela, Karo.

    In: The Electronic Journal of e-Government, Vol. 13, No. 1, 2015, p. 56-66.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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