Enzymatic Degradation and Pilot-Scale Composting of Cellulose-Based Films with Different Chemical Structures

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Abstract

In this study, we investigated the enzymatical degradability and pilot-scale composting of 14 cellulose-based materials. The materials analyzed here were cellulose regenerated from ionic liquid (EMIM[OAc]), carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) crosslinked by aluminum salt (Al-salt), methyl cellulose, cellulose acetate, butylated hemicellulose: DS: 1, DS: 0.4, and DS: 0.2, cellophane, wet strength paper, nanocellulose, paper partially dissolved by IL, cellulose carbamate, cellulose palmitate, and cellulose octanoate. The aim of the study was to show how chemical substituting and the substituent itself influence the biodegradability of cellulose materials. The enzymatic degradation and pilot-scale composting of these films shows the correlation between the hydrolysis rate and degree of substitution. The enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose-based films decreased exponentially as the degree of substitution increased. Modifying cellulose to the extent that it gains the strength needed to obtain good mechanical properties, while retaining its natural biodegradability is an important factor when preparing alternatives for plastic films.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Polymers and the Environment
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 27 Nov 2019
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

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Composting
Cellulose
Degradation
Biodegradability
Substitution reactions
Cellophane
Ionic Liquids
Plastic films
Carboxymethylcellulose Sodium
Methylcellulose
Enzymatic hydrolysis
Carbamates
Palmitates
Aluminum
Hydrolysis
Salts
Ionic liquids
Mechanical properties

Cite this

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title = "Enzymatic Degradation and Pilot-Scale Composting of Cellulose-Based Films with Different Chemical Structures",
abstract = "In this study, we investigated the enzymatical degradability and pilot-scale composting of 14 cellulose-based materials. The materials analyzed here were cellulose regenerated from ionic liquid (EMIM[OAc]), carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) crosslinked by aluminum salt (Al-salt), methyl cellulose, cellulose acetate, butylated hemicellulose: DS: 1, DS: 0.4, and DS: 0.2, cellophane, wet strength paper, nanocellulose, paper partially dissolved by IL, cellulose carbamate, cellulose palmitate, and cellulose octanoate. The aim of the study was to show how chemical substituting and the substituent itself influence the biodegradability of cellulose materials. The enzymatic degradation and pilot-scale composting of these films shows the correlation between the hydrolysis rate and degree of substitution. The enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose-based films decreased exponentially as the degree of substitution increased. Modifying cellulose to the extent that it gains the strength needed to obtain good mechanical properties, while retaining its natural biodegradability is an important factor when preparing alternatives for plastic films.",
author = "Ilona Lepp{\"a}nen and Minna Vikman and Ali Harlin and Hannes Orelma",
year = "2019",
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language = "English",
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T1 - Enzymatic Degradation and Pilot-Scale Composting of Cellulose-Based Films with Different Chemical Structures

AU - Leppänen, Ilona

AU - Vikman, Minna

AU - Harlin, Ali

AU - Orelma, Hannes

PY - 2019/11/27

Y1 - 2019/11/27

N2 - In this study, we investigated the enzymatical degradability and pilot-scale composting of 14 cellulose-based materials. The materials analyzed here were cellulose regenerated from ionic liquid (EMIM[OAc]), carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) crosslinked by aluminum salt (Al-salt), methyl cellulose, cellulose acetate, butylated hemicellulose: DS: 1, DS: 0.4, and DS: 0.2, cellophane, wet strength paper, nanocellulose, paper partially dissolved by IL, cellulose carbamate, cellulose palmitate, and cellulose octanoate. The aim of the study was to show how chemical substituting and the substituent itself influence the biodegradability of cellulose materials. The enzymatic degradation and pilot-scale composting of these films shows the correlation between the hydrolysis rate and degree of substitution. The enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose-based films decreased exponentially as the degree of substitution increased. Modifying cellulose to the extent that it gains the strength needed to obtain good mechanical properties, while retaining its natural biodegradability is an important factor when preparing alternatives for plastic films.

AB - In this study, we investigated the enzymatical degradability and pilot-scale composting of 14 cellulose-based materials. The materials analyzed here were cellulose regenerated from ionic liquid (EMIM[OAc]), carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) crosslinked by aluminum salt (Al-salt), methyl cellulose, cellulose acetate, butylated hemicellulose: DS: 1, DS: 0.4, and DS: 0.2, cellophane, wet strength paper, nanocellulose, paper partially dissolved by IL, cellulose carbamate, cellulose palmitate, and cellulose octanoate. The aim of the study was to show how chemical substituting and the substituent itself influence the biodegradability of cellulose materials. The enzymatic degradation and pilot-scale composting of these films shows the correlation between the hydrolysis rate and degree of substitution. The enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose-based films decreased exponentially as the degree of substitution increased. Modifying cellulose to the extent that it gains the strength needed to obtain good mechanical properties, while retaining its natural biodegradability is an important factor when preparing alternatives for plastic films.

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DO - 10.1007/s10924-019-01621-w

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SN - 1566-2543

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