Erratum: Fox, S. Irresponsible research and innovation? Applying findings from neuroscience to the analysis of unsustainable hype cycles. [Sustainability, 10, 3472 (2018)], 10.3390/su10103472]

    Research output: Contribution to journalOther journal contributionScientificpeer-review

    Abstract

    The author would like to make the corrections listed below to the published paper [1]. (1) In Section 4.3. Implications for Practice, replacing citation 73 with citation 94. This citation correction involves no changes to the References list. (2) In Section 5. Conclusions, adding a reference and revision in order to clarify the paper's final paragraphs by replacing the original version: Similarly, some proponents of robotics envisage that robots will emancipate humans by undertaking all working and paying taxes to fund our entertainment. By contrast, some opponents of robotics envisage that robots will consume all available resources, including all humans [139]. More support for responsible research and innovation is needed from both sides of such polarized positions. In this paper, an analogy has been drawn between the behavior of some adults in hype cycles and irresponsible adolescent behavior. However, there are also other potential analogies that could be explored in the broader literature concerned with predictably irrational decision making [140]. with Similarly, some envisage that robots could pay taxes to help humans [139], while others envisage that robots could harm humans [140]. Thus, even reasoned debate concerning technology, which has been hyped-up by others, can take place at opposite ends of a continuum. Such debate can overlook that whatever end prevails, there could be environmental degradation. Hence, more consideration for human/environmental balance can be needed from both sides of polarized positions. Overall, in this paper, an analogy has been drawn between the behavior of some adults in hype cycles and irresponsible adolescent behavior. As stated in the Introduction section, cases are referred to in order to illustrate patterns in hype cycles, not to define individual motivations in specific cases. Additionally, it is important to note that there may be other potential analogies in the broader literature concerned with predictably irrational decision making [141]. And consequently adding the following reference to the References list: 140. Bostrom, N. Ethical issues in advanced artificial intelligence. In Cognitive, Emotive and Ethical Aspects of Decision Making in Humans and in Artificial Intelligence; Smit, I., Lasker, G.E., Eds.; International Institute for Advanced Studies in Systems Research and Cybernetics: Windsor, ON, Canada, 2003; Volume 2, pp. 12-17.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number6387
    JournalSustainability
    Volume11
    Issue number22
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 2019
    MoE publication typeNot Eligible

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    neurosciences
    robot
    Sustainable development
    innovation
    Innovation
    sustainability
    Robots
    artificial intelligence
    Decision making
    decision making
    robotics
    Taxation
    Artificial intelligence
    taxes
    Robotics
    adolescent
    Cybernetics
    cybernetics
    systems research
    Weathering

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    @article{dd9776d314344978aa433d4a3043afa4,
    title = "Erratum: Fox, S. Irresponsible research and innovation? Applying findings from neuroscience to the analysis of unsustainable hype cycles. [Sustainability, 10, 3472 (2018)], 10.3390/su10103472]",
    abstract = "The author would like to make the corrections listed below to the published paper [1]. (1) In Section 4.3. Implications for Practice, replacing citation 73 with citation 94. This citation correction involves no changes to the References list. (2) In Section 5. Conclusions, adding a reference and revision in order to clarify the paper's final paragraphs by replacing the original version: Similarly, some proponents of robotics envisage that robots will emancipate humans by undertaking all working and paying taxes to fund our entertainment. By contrast, some opponents of robotics envisage that robots will consume all available resources, including all humans [139]. More support for responsible research and innovation is needed from both sides of such polarized positions. In this paper, an analogy has been drawn between the behavior of some adults in hype cycles and irresponsible adolescent behavior. However, there are also other potential analogies that could be explored in the broader literature concerned with predictably irrational decision making [140]. with Similarly, some envisage that robots could pay taxes to help humans [139], while others envisage that robots could harm humans [140]. Thus, even reasoned debate concerning technology, which has been hyped-up by others, can take place at opposite ends of a continuum. Such debate can overlook that whatever end prevails, there could be environmental degradation. Hence, more consideration for human/environmental balance can be needed from both sides of polarized positions. Overall, in this paper, an analogy has been drawn between the behavior of some adults in hype cycles and irresponsible adolescent behavior. As stated in the Introduction section, cases are referred to in order to illustrate patterns in hype cycles, not to define individual motivations in specific cases. Additionally, it is important to note that there may be other potential analogies in the broader literature concerned with predictably irrational decision making [141]. And consequently adding the following reference to the References list: 140. Bostrom, N. Ethical issues in advanced artificial intelligence. In Cognitive, Emotive and Ethical Aspects of Decision Making in Humans and in Artificial Intelligence; Smit, I., Lasker, G.E., Eds.; International Institute for Advanced Studies in Systems Research and Cybernetics: Windsor, ON, Canada, 2003; Volume 2, pp. 12-17.",
    author = "Stephen Fox",
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    T2 - Fox, S. Irresponsible research and innovation? Applying findings from neuroscience to the analysis of unsustainable hype cycles. [Sustainability, 10, 3472 (2018)], 10.3390/su10103472]

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    N2 - The author would like to make the corrections listed below to the published paper [1]. (1) In Section 4.3. Implications for Practice, replacing citation 73 with citation 94. This citation correction involves no changes to the References list. (2) In Section 5. Conclusions, adding a reference and revision in order to clarify the paper's final paragraphs by replacing the original version: Similarly, some proponents of robotics envisage that robots will emancipate humans by undertaking all working and paying taxes to fund our entertainment. By contrast, some opponents of robotics envisage that robots will consume all available resources, including all humans [139]. More support for responsible research and innovation is needed from both sides of such polarized positions. In this paper, an analogy has been drawn between the behavior of some adults in hype cycles and irresponsible adolescent behavior. However, there are also other potential analogies that could be explored in the broader literature concerned with predictably irrational decision making [140]. with Similarly, some envisage that robots could pay taxes to help humans [139], while others envisage that robots could harm humans [140]. Thus, even reasoned debate concerning technology, which has been hyped-up by others, can take place at opposite ends of a continuum. Such debate can overlook that whatever end prevails, there could be environmental degradation. Hence, more consideration for human/environmental balance can be needed from both sides of polarized positions. Overall, in this paper, an analogy has been drawn between the behavior of some adults in hype cycles and irresponsible adolescent behavior. As stated in the Introduction section, cases are referred to in order to illustrate patterns in hype cycles, not to define individual motivations in specific cases. Additionally, it is important to note that there may be other potential analogies in the broader literature concerned with predictably irrational decision making [141]. And consequently adding the following reference to the References list: 140. Bostrom, N. Ethical issues in advanced artificial intelligence. In Cognitive, Emotive and Ethical Aspects of Decision Making in Humans and in Artificial Intelligence; Smit, I., Lasker, G.E., Eds.; International Institute for Advanced Studies in Systems Research and Cybernetics: Windsor, ON, Canada, 2003; Volume 2, pp. 12-17.

    AB - The author would like to make the corrections listed below to the published paper [1]. (1) In Section 4.3. Implications for Practice, replacing citation 73 with citation 94. This citation correction involves no changes to the References list. (2) In Section 5. Conclusions, adding a reference and revision in order to clarify the paper's final paragraphs by replacing the original version: Similarly, some proponents of robotics envisage that robots will emancipate humans by undertaking all working and paying taxes to fund our entertainment. By contrast, some opponents of robotics envisage that robots will consume all available resources, including all humans [139]. More support for responsible research and innovation is needed from both sides of such polarized positions. In this paper, an analogy has been drawn between the behavior of some adults in hype cycles and irresponsible adolescent behavior. However, there are also other potential analogies that could be explored in the broader literature concerned with predictably irrational decision making [140]. with Similarly, some envisage that robots could pay taxes to help humans [139], while others envisage that robots could harm humans [140]. Thus, even reasoned debate concerning technology, which has been hyped-up by others, can take place at opposite ends of a continuum. Such debate can overlook that whatever end prevails, there could be environmental degradation. Hence, more consideration for human/environmental balance can be needed from both sides of polarized positions. Overall, in this paper, an analogy has been drawn between the behavior of some adults in hype cycles and irresponsible adolescent behavior. As stated in the Introduction section, cases are referred to in order to illustrate patterns in hype cycles, not to define individual motivations in specific cases. Additionally, it is important to note that there may be other potential analogies in the broader literature concerned with predictably irrational decision making [141]. And consequently adding the following reference to the References list: 140. Bostrom, N. Ethical issues in advanced artificial intelligence. In Cognitive, Emotive and Ethical Aspects of Decision Making in Humans and in Artificial Intelligence; Smit, I., Lasker, G.E., Eds.; International Institute for Advanced Studies in Systems Research and Cybernetics: Windsor, ON, Canada, 2003; Volume 2, pp. 12-17.

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