Expert identify construct in analysis prerequisites for expertise development: A case study of nuclear power plant operators on-the-job training

Maaria Nuutinen (Corresponding Author)

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This article discusses how shifting the focus of research to the emotional side of human actions and cognition could create new perspectives on the problem of how to support the human operator in the control of rare disturbances. A new construct, Expert Identity, is described. A qualitative study of the specific problems with changing the operator generation at a nuclear power plant is presented. The results indicate that the current identity of the trainees is more or less still one of the trainees. The conceived demands of operator work and the perceived learning opportunities are characterised by a dichotomy: disturbances or other exceptional situations emerge as different from daily work. The key challenge and motive for the trainees in the development of expertise is to achieve not only an adequate degree of competence but also to construct confidence in being able to cope with potential disturbance situations.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)288 - 305
    Number of pages8
    JournalCognition, Technology and Work
    Volume7
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2005
    MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

    Keywords

    • process control
    • emotions
    • expert identify
    • on-the-job training
    • work analysis
    • nuclear power plants

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