Exposure of population and micro-environmental distributions of volatile organic compound concentration in five European cities

Kristina Saarela (Corresponding author), Tiina Tirkkonen, Jutta Laine-Ylijoki, Jouni Jurvelin, Matti Jantunen

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference article in proceedingsScientificpeer-review

    Abstract

    Determination of volatile organic compounds, VOCs, formed one part of the EU- EXPOLIS project in which the exposure of European urban population was studied. In the project 201 subjects in Helsinki, 50 in Athens, 50 in Basel, 50 in Milan and 50 in Prague were studied. The microenvironmental and personal exposure in Helsinki and Basel were lowest within all chemical compound groups and remarkable was the complete absence of halogenated compounds in Helsinki. The far highest microenvironmental concentrations of aromatics were in Athens and somewhat lower in Milan. The study was planned in such a way, that the role of microenvironmental concentrations in covering the total exposure could be calculated and their coverage of personal exposure estimated. This comparison suggested that the aromatics and to some extent the alkanes had stronger sources elsewhere than the indoor or residential outdoor environments.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationIndoor Air 2002, 9th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate
    PublisherInternational Academy of Indoor Air Sciences
    Pages555-560
    Volume2
    Publication statusPublished - 2002
    MoE publication typeNot Eligible
    Event9th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate, Indoor Air 2002 - Monterey, United States
    Duration: 30 Jun 20025 Jul 2002
    Conference number: 9

    Conference

    Conference9th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate, Indoor Air 2002
    Abbreviated titleIndoor Air 2002
    CountryUnited States
    CityMonterey
    Period30/06/025/07/02

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