Factors affecting the conversion of apple polyphenols to phenolic acids and fruit matrix to short-chain fatty acids by human faecal microbiota in vitro

Sarah Bazzocco, Ismo Mattila, Sylvain Guyot, Catherine M. G. C. Renard, Anna-Marja Aura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Proanthocyanidins (PAs) in apples are condensed tannins comprised mostly of (−)-epicatechin units with some terminal (+)-catechins. PAs, especially those having a long chain-length, are absorbed in the upper intestine only to a small extent and are passed to the colon. In the colon they are subjected to microbial metabolism by colonic microbiota. In the present article, the ability of human microbiota to ferment apple PAs is studied. Freeze-dried fruit preparations (apple, enzymatically digested apple, isolated cell-walls, isolated PAs or ciders) from two varieties, Marie Ménard and Avrolles, containing PAs of different chain lengths, were compared. Fermentation studies were performed in an in vitro colon model using human faecal microbiota as an inoculum. The maximal extent of conversion to known microbial metabolites, was observed at late time point for Marie Ménard cider, having short PAs. In this case, the initial dose also contributed to the extent of conversion. Long-chain PAs were able to inhibit the in vitro microbial metabolism of PAs shown as low maxima at early time points. Presence of isolated PAs also suppressed SCFA formation from carbohydrates as compared with that from apple cell wall or faecal suspension without substrates. The low maximal extents at early time points suggest that there is a competition between the inhibitory effect of the PAs on microbial activity, and the ability to convert PAs by the microbiota.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)442 - 452
JournalEuropean Journal of Nutrition
Volume47
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

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Proanthocyanidins
Volatile Fatty Acids
Microbiota
Malus
Polyphenols
Fruit
Colon
Catechin
Cell Wall
phenolic acid
In Vitro Techniques
Fermentation
Intestines
Suspensions

Keywords

  • cell-wall
  • gut microbiota
  • in vitro fermentation
  • Malus domestica Borkh
  • procyanidin

Cite this

@article{243b3e7b575440ccbd42fe1a217ad8e2,
title = "Factors affecting the conversion of apple polyphenols to phenolic acids and fruit matrix to short-chain fatty acids by human faecal microbiota in vitro",
abstract = "Proanthocyanidins (PAs) in apples are condensed tannins comprised mostly of (−)-epicatechin units with some terminal (+)-catechins. PAs, especially those having a long chain-length, are absorbed in the upper intestine only to a small extent and are passed to the colon. In the colon they are subjected to microbial metabolism by colonic microbiota. In the present article, the ability of human microbiota to ferment apple PAs is studied. Freeze-dried fruit preparations (apple, enzymatically digested apple, isolated cell-walls, isolated PAs or ciders) from two varieties, Marie M{\'e}nard and Avrolles, containing PAs of different chain lengths, were compared. Fermentation studies were performed in an in vitro colon model using human faecal microbiota as an inoculum. The maximal extent of conversion to known microbial metabolites, was observed at late time point for Marie M{\'e}nard cider, having short PAs. In this case, the initial dose also contributed to the extent of conversion. Long-chain PAs were able to inhibit the in vitro microbial metabolism of PAs shown as low maxima at early time points. Presence of isolated PAs also suppressed SCFA formation from carbohydrates as compared with that from apple cell wall or faecal suspension without substrates. The low maximal extents at early time points suggest that there is a competition between the inhibitory effect of the PAs on microbial activity, and the ability to convert PAs by the microbiota.",
keywords = "cell-wall, gut microbiota, in vitro fermentation, Malus domestica Borkh, procyanidin",
author = "Sarah Bazzocco and Ismo Mattila and Sylvain Guyot and Renard, {Catherine M. G. C.} and Anna-Marja Aura",
year = "2008",
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volume = "47",
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Factors affecting the conversion of apple polyphenols to phenolic acids and fruit matrix to short-chain fatty acids by human faecal microbiota in vitro. / Bazzocco, Sarah; Mattila, Ismo; Guyot, Sylvain; Renard, Catherine M. G. C.; Aura, Anna-Marja.

In: European Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 47, No. 8, 2008, p. 442 - 452.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Factors affecting the conversion of apple polyphenols to phenolic acids and fruit matrix to short-chain fatty acids by human faecal microbiota in vitro

AU - Bazzocco, Sarah

AU - Mattila, Ismo

AU - Guyot, Sylvain

AU - Renard, Catherine M. G. C.

AU - Aura, Anna-Marja

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - Proanthocyanidins (PAs) in apples are condensed tannins comprised mostly of (−)-epicatechin units with some terminal (+)-catechins. PAs, especially those having a long chain-length, are absorbed in the upper intestine only to a small extent and are passed to the colon. In the colon they are subjected to microbial metabolism by colonic microbiota. In the present article, the ability of human microbiota to ferment apple PAs is studied. Freeze-dried fruit preparations (apple, enzymatically digested apple, isolated cell-walls, isolated PAs or ciders) from two varieties, Marie Ménard and Avrolles, containing PAs of different chain lengths, were compared. Fermentation studies were performed in an in vitro colon model using human faecal microbiota as an inoculum. The maximal extent of conversion to known microbial metabolites, was observed at late time point for Marie Ménard cider, having short PAs. In this case, the initial dose also contributed to the extent of conversion. Long-chain PAs were able to inhibit the in vitro microbial metabolism of PAs shown as low maxima at early time points. Presence of isolated PAs also suppressed SCFA formation from carbohydrates as compared with that from apple cell wall or faecal suspension without substrates. The low maximal extents at early time points suggest that there is a competition between the inhibitory effect of the PAs on microbial activity, and the ability to convert PAs by the microbiota.

AB - Proanthocyanidins (PAs) in apples are condensed tannins comprised mostly of (−)-epicatechin units with some terminal (+)-catechins. PAs, especially those having a long chain-length, are absorbed in the upper intestine only to a small extent and are passed to the colon. In the colon they are subjected to microbial metabolism by colonic microbiota. In the present article, the ability of human microbiota to ferment apple PAs is studied. Freeze-dried fruit preparations (apple, enzymatically digested apple, isolated cell-walls, isolated PAs or ciders) from two varieties, Marie Ménard and Avrolles, containing PAs of different chain lengths, were compared. Fermentation studies were performed in an in vitro colon model using human faecal microbiota as an inoculum. The maximal extent of conversion to known microbial metabolites, was observed at late time point for Marie Ménard cider, having short PAs. In this case, the initial dose also contributed to the extent of conversion. Long-chain PAs were able to inhibit the in vitro microbial metabolism of PAs shown as low maxima at early time points. Presence of isolated PAs also suppressed SCFA formation from carbohydrates as compared with that from apple cell wall or faecal suspension without substrates. The low maximal extents at early time points suggest that there is a competition between the inhibitory effect of the PAs on microbial activity, and the ability to convert PAs by the microbiota.

KW - cell-wall

KW - gut microbiota

KW - in vitro fermentation

KW - Malus domestica Borkh

KW - procyanidin

U2 - 10.1007/s00394-008-0747-2

DO - 10.1007/s00394-008-0747-2

M3 - Article

VL - 47

SP - 442

EP - 452

JO - European Journal of Nutrition

JF - European Journal of Nutrition

SN - 1436-6207

IS - 8

ER -