Factors affecting the development of biodeterioration in wooden constructions

Hannu Viitanen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Water leakages are the general cause of moisture stress exceeding the moisture tolerances of constructions. Moisture stress causes biodeterioration (mould, rot and insect damage) in wooden constructions. The degree of damage is affected by the severity and duration of moisture exposure and temperature, together with the sensitivity of the wooden construction to environmental stress. The growth of mould fungi on wooden materials depends mainly on the air humidity, temperature and the surface quality of wood. Long term humidity conditions above a relative humidity (RH) of 80% are a risk for mould growth in pine and spruce sapwood when the temperature is between +5°C and +50°C. Between −5°C and +5°C the growth of mould fungi is slow, and possible only when the relative humidity is above 90%. High nutrient content of the surface can stimulate the mould growth. In fluctuating humidity conditions, the severity and cumulative time of conditions suitable for mould growth are critical factors for the development of mould fungi in constructions. Humidity conditions must be above RH 95% (around the fibre saturation point of wood, wood moisture content about 25–30%) for the spore germination and mycelium activation of brown rot fungi. Under unsuitable conditions, fungi are inactive, but they can become active quickly under suitable conditions. The degree of decay in wood depends on the total time the decay organism is active. The natural durability of wood varies with the environmental conditions, wood characteristics (wood species, sapwood or heartwood, etc.) and the decay organisms. The service time of wooden materials can be extended by modification of the wood.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)483-493
Number of pages11
JournalMaterials and Structures
Volume27
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1994
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fingerprint

Wooden construction
Wood
Atmospheric humidity
Fungi
Moisture
Decay (organic)
Temperature
Nutrients
Surface properties
Durability
Chemical activation

Cite this

@article{fba12919d28949b1994ad88b570009fa,
title = "Factors affecting the development of biodeterioration in wooden constructions",
abstract = "Water leakages are the general cause of moisture stress exceeding the moisture tolerances of constructions. Moisture stress causes biodeterioration (mould, rot and insect damage) in wooden constructions. The degree of damage is affected by the severity and duration of moisture exposure and temperature, together with the sensitivity of the wooden construction to environmental stress. The growth of mould fungi on wooden materials depends mainly on the air humidity, temperature and the surface quality of wood. Long term humidity conditions above a relative humidity (RH) of 80{\%} are a risk for mould growth in pine and spruce sapwood when the temperature is between +5°C and +50°C. Between −5°C and +5°C the growth of mould fungi is slow, and possible only when the relative humidity is above 90{\%}. High nutrient content of the surface can stimulate the mould growth. In fluctuating humidity conditions, the severity and cumulative time of conditions suitable for mould growth are critical factors for the development of mould fungi in constructions. Humidity conditions must be above RH 95{\%} (around the fibre saturation point of wood, wood moisture content about 25–30{\%}) for the spore germination and mycelium activation of brown rot fungi. Under unsuitable conditions, fungi are inactive, but they can become active quickly under suitable conditions. The degree of decay in wood depends on the total time the decay organism is active. The natural durability of wood varies with the environmental conditions, wood characteristics (wood species, sapwood or heartwood, etc.) and the decay organisms. The service time of wooden materials can be extended by modification of the wood.",
author = "Hannu Viitanen",
year = "1994",
doi = "10.1007{\%}2FBF02473453",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "483--493",
journal = "Materials and Structures",
issn = "1359-5997",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "8",

}

Factors affecting the development of biodeterioration in wooden constructions. / Viitanen, Hannu.

In: Materials and Structures, Vol. 27, No. 8, 1994, p. 483-493.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Factors affecting the development of biodeterioration in wooden constructions

AU - Viitanen, Hannu

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - Water leakages are the general cause of moisture stress exceeding the moisture tolerances of constructions. Moisture stress causes biodeterioration (mould, rot and insect damage) in wooden constructions. The degree of damage is affected by the severity and duration of moisture exposure and temperature, together with the sensitivity of the wooden construction to environmental stress. The growth of mould fungi on wooden materials depends mainly on the air humidity, temperature and the surface quality of wood. Long term humidity conditions above a relative humidity (RH) of 80% are a risk for mould growth in pine and spruce sapwood when the temperature is between +5°C and +50°C. Between −5°C and +5°C the growth of mould fungi is slow, and possible only when the relative humidity is above 90%. High nutrient content of the surface can stimulate the mould growth. In fluctuating humidity conditions, the severity and cumulative time of conditions suitable for mould growth are critical factors for the development of mould fungi in constructions. Humidity conditions must be above RH 95% (around the fibre saturation point of wood, wood moisture content about 25–30%) for the spore germination and mycelium activation of brown rot fungi. Under unsuitable conditions, fungi are inactive, but they can become active quickly under suitable conditions. The degree of decay in wood depends on the total time the decay organism is active. The natural durability of wood varies with the environmental conditions, wood characteristics (wood species, sapwood or heartwood, etc.) and the decay organisms. The service time of wooden materials can be extended by modification of the wood.

AB - Water leakages are the general cause of moisture stress exceeding the moisture tolerances of constructions. Moisture stress causes biodeterioration (mould, rot and insect damage) in wooden constructions. The degree of damage is affected by the severity and duration of moisture exposure and temperature, together with the sensitivity of the wooden construction to environmental stress. The growth of mould fungi on wooden materials depends mainly on the air humidity, temperature and the surface quality of wood. Long term humidity conditions above a relative humidity (RH) of 80% are a risk for mould growth in pine and spruce sapwood when the temperature is between +5°C and +50°C. Between −5°C and +5°C the growth of mould fungi is slow, and possible only when the relative humidity is above 90%. High nutrient content of the surface can stimulate the mould growth. In fluctuating humidity conditions, the severity and cumulative time of conditions suitable for mould growth are critical factors for the development of mould fungi in constructions. Humidity conditions must be above RH 95% (around the fibre saturation point of wood, wood moisture content about 25–30%) for the spore germination and mycelium activation of brown rot fungi. Under unsuitable conditions, fungi are inactive, but they can become active quickly under suitable conditions. The degree of decay in wood depends on the total time the decay organism is active. The natural durability of wood varies with the environmental conditions, wood characteristics (wood species, sapwood or heartwood, etc.) and the decay organisms. The service time of wooden materials can be extended by modification of the wood.

U2 - 10.1007%2FBF02473453

DO - 10.1007%2FBF02473453

M3 - Article

VL - 27

SP - 483

EP - 493

JO - Materials and Structures

JF - Materials and Structures

SN - 1359-5997

IS - 8

ER -