Factors associated with maximal walking speed among older community-living adults

Janne Sallinen (Corresponding Author), Minna Mänty, Raija Leinonen, Mauri Kallinen, Timo Törmäkangas, Eino Heikkinen, Taina Rantanen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and aims: The relative contribution of different domains on walking speed is largely unknown. This study investigated the central factors associated with maximal walking speed among older people. Methods: Cross-sectional analyses of baseline data from the SCAMOB study (ISRCTN 07330512) involving 605 community-living ambulatory adults aged 75–81 years. Maximal walking speed, leg extensor power, standing balance and body mass index were measured at the research center. Physical activity, smoking, use of alcohol, chronic diseases and depressive symptoms were self-reported by standard questionnaires. Results: The mean maximal walking speed was 1.4 m/s (range 0.3–2.9). In linear regression analysis, age, gender and body mass index explained 11% of the variation in maximal walking speed. Adding leg extensor power and standing balance into the model increased the variation explained to 38%. Further adjusting for physical activity, smoking status and use of alcohol increased the variation explained by an additional 7%. A minor further increase in variability explained was gained by adding chronic diseases and depressive symptoms to the model. In the final model, the single most important factors associated with walking speed were leg extensor power, standing balance and physical activity, and these associations were similar in men and women and in different body mass index categories. Conclusions: Lower extremity impairment and physical inactivity were the central factors associated with slow walking speed among older people, probably because these factors capture the influences of health changes and other life-style factors, potentially leading to walking limitations.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)273-278
JournalAging clinical and experimental research
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fingerprint

Leg
Body Mass Index
Exercise
Chronic Disease
Smoking
Alcohols
Depression
Walking Speed
Walking
Life Style
Lower Extremity
Linear Models
Cross-Sectional Studies
Regression Analysis
Health
Research
Power (Psychology)
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

Sallinen, J., Mänty, M., Leinonen, R., Kallinen, M., Törmäkangas, T., Heikkinen, E., & Rantanen, T. (2011). Factors associated with maximal walking speed among older community-living adults. Aging clinical and experimental research, 23(4), 273-278. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03337753
Sallinen, Janne ; Mänty, Minna ; Leinonen, Raija ; Kallinen, Mauri ; Törmäkangas, Timo ; Heikkinen, Eino ; Rantanen, Taina. / Factors associated with maximal walking speed among older community-living adults. In: Aging clinical and experimental research. 2011 ; Vol. 23, No. 4. pp. 273-278.
@article{4944c391b7d442ed843357d33b934785,
title = "Factors associated with maximal walking speed among older community-living adults",
abstract = "Background and aims: The relative contribution of different domains on walking speed is largely unknown. This study investigated the central factors associated with maximal walking speed among older people. Methods: Cross-sectional analyses of baseline data from the SCAMOB study (ISRCTN 07330512) involving 605 community-living ambulatory adults aged 75–81 years. Maximal walking speed, leg extensor power, standing balance and body mass index were measured at the research center. Physical activity, smoking, use of alcohol, chronic diseases and depressive symptoms were self-reported by standard questionnaires. Results: The mean maximal walking speed was 1.4 m/s (range 0.3–2.9). In linear regression analysis, age, gender and body mass index explained 11{\%} of the variation in maximal walking speed. Adding leg extensor power and standing balance into the model increased the variation explained to 38{\%}. Further adjusting for physical activity, smoking status and use of alcohol increased the variation explained by an additional 7{\%}. A minor further increase in variability explained was gained by adding chronic diseases and depressive symptoms to the model. In the final model, the single most important factors associated with walking speed were leg extensor power, standing balance and physical activity, and these associations were similar in men and women and in different body mass index categories. Conclusions: Lower extremity impairment and physical inactivity were the central factors associated with slow walking speed among older people, probably because these factors capture the influences of health changes and other life-style factors, potentially leading to walking limitations.",
author = "Janne Sallinen and Minna M{\"a}nty and Raija Leinonen and Mauri Kallinen and Timo T{\"o}rm{\"a}kangas and Eino Heikkinen and Taina Rantanen",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1007/BF03337753",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "273--278",
journal = "Aging clinical and experimental research",
issn = "1594-0667",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "4",

}

Sallinen, J, Mänty, M, Leinonen, R, Kallinen, M, Törmäkangas, T, Heikkinen, E & Rantanen, T 2011, 'Factors associated with maximal walking speed among older community-living adults', Aging clinical and experimental research, vol. 23, no. 4, pp. 273-278. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03337753

Factors associated with maximal walking speed among older community-living adults. / Sallinen, Janne (Corresponding Author); Mänty, Minna; Leinonen, Raija; Kallinen, Mauri; Törmäkangas, Timo; Heikkinen, Eino; Rantanen, Taina.

In: Aging clinical and experimental research, Vol. 23, No. 4, 2011, p. 273-278.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Factors associated with maximal walking speed among older community-living adults

AU - Sallinen, Janne

AU - Mänty, Minna

AU - Leinonen, Raija

AU - Kallinen, Mauri

AU - Törmäkangas, Timo

AU - Heikkinen, Eino

AU - Rantanen, Taina

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Background and aims: The relative contribution of different domains on walking speed is largely unknown. This study investigated the central factors associated with maximal walking speed among older people. Methods: Cross-sectional analyses of baseline data from the SCAMOB study (ISRCTN 07330512) involving 605 community-living ambulatory adults aged 75–81 years. Maximal walking speed, leg extensor power, standing balance and body mass index were measured at the research center. Physical activity, smoking, use of alcohol, chronic diseases and depressive symptoms were self-reported by standard questionnaires. Results: The mean maximal walking speed was 1.4 m/s (range 0.3–2.9). In linear regression analysis, age, gender and body mass index explained 11% of the variation in maximal walking speed. Adding leg extensor power and standing balance into the model increased the variation explained to 38%. Further adjusting for physical activity, smoking status and use of alcohol increased the variation explained by an additional 7%. A minor further increase in variability explained was gained by adding chronic diseases and depressive symptoms to the model. In the final model, the single most important factors associated with walking speed were leg extensor power, standing balance and physical activity, and these associations were similar in men and women and in different body mass index categories. Conclusions: Lower extremity impairment and physical inactivity were the central factors associated with slow walking speed among older people, probably because these factors capture the influences of health changes and other life-style factors, potentially leading to walking limitations.

AB - Background and aims: The relative contribution of different domains on walking speed is largely unknown. This study investigated the central factors associated with maximal walking speed among older people. Methods: Cross-sectional analyses of baseline data from the SCAMOB study (ISRCTN 07330512) involving 605 community-living ambulatory adults aged 75–81 years. Maximal walking speed, leg extensor power, standing balance and body mass index were measured at the research center. Physical activity, smoking, use of alcohol, chronic diseases and depressive symptoms were self-reported by standard questionnaires. Results: The mean maximal walking speed was 1.4 m/s (range 0.3–2.9). In linear regression analysis, age, gender and body mass index explained 11% of the variation in maximal walking speed. Adding leg extensor power and standing balance into the model increased the variation explained to 38%. Further adjusting for physical activity, smoking status and use of alcohol increased the variation explained by an additional 7%. A minor further increase in variability explained was gained by adding chronic diseases and depressive symptoms to the model. In the final model, the single most important factors associated with walking speed were leg extensor power, standing balance and physical activity, and these associations were similar in men and women and in different body mass index categories. Conclusions: Lower extremity impairment and physical inactivity were the central factors associated with slow walking speed among older people, probably because these factors capture the influences of health changes and other life-style factors, potentially leading to walking limitations.

U2 - 10.1007/BF03337753

DO - 10.1007/BF03337753

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 273

EP - 278

JO - Aging clinical and experimental research

JF - Aging clinical and experimental research

SN - 1594-0667

IS - 4

ER -

Sallinen J, Mänty M, Leinonen R, Kallinen M, Törmäkangas T, Heikkinen E et al. Factors associated with maximal walking speed among older community-living adults. Aging clinical and experimental research. 2011;23(4):273-278. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03337753