Field testing of stainless steels in paper machine environment

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

At the wet ends of paper machines and especially at splash zones, pitting and crevice corrosion of stainless steels caused by chloride (C[Symbol Not Transcribed]) and thiosulphate (S[Symbol Not Transcribed]O[Symbol Not Transcribed]) ions is a common phenomenon. Chloride ions originate from wood floated in sea water, supplied water and chemicals added to the pulp mix. Mechanical pulp brightened with dithionite (S[Symbol Not Transcribed]O[Symbol Not Transcribed]) is the main source of thiosulphate ions (f.1). Thiosulphate pitting is known to occur within a narrow voltage potential range (f.2) and molar ratio [Equation Not Transcribed] (f.3). The most sensitive region for thiosulphate pitting is in the potential range of 0 to -400 mV[Symbol Not Transcribed] (f.4) and molar ratios of 10 to 30 (f.3). To initiate thiosulphate pitting corrosion on type 316L stainless steel the molar ratio [C[Symbol Not Transcribed]]/[SO[Symbol Not Transcribed]] should be [Symbol Not Transcribed]1 (f.3).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-50
Number of pages4
JournalPulp and Paper Canada
Volume100
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1999
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

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Thiosulfates
Stainless Steel
Pitting
Stainless steel
Testing
Ions
Corrosion
Chlorides
Mechanical pulp
Dithionite
Water
Pulp
Wood
Steel
Symbol
Electric potential

Cite this

@article{a25e9e36dff447549c02ba34c65d0114,
title = "Field testing of stainless steels in paper machine environment",
abstract = "At the wet ends of paper machines and especially at splash zones, pitting and crevice corrosion of stainless steels caused by chloride (C[Symbol Not Transcribed]) and thiosulphate (S[Symbol Not Transcribed]O[Symbol Not Transcribed]) ions is a common phenomenon. Chloride ions originate from wood floated in sea water, supplied water and chemicals added to the pulp mix. Mechanical pulp brightened with dithionite (S[Symbol Not Transcribed]O[Symbol Not Transcribed]) is the main source of thiosulphate ions (f.1). Thiosulphate pitting is known to occur within a narrow voltage potential range (f.2) and molar ratio [Equation Not Transcribed] (f.3). The most sensitive region for thiosulphate pitting is in the potential range of 0 to -400 mV[Symbol Not Transcribed] (f.4) and molar ratios of 10 to 30 (f.3). To initiate thiosulphate pitting corrosion on type 316L stainless steel the molar ratio [C[Symbol Not Transcribed]]/[SO[Symbol Not Transcribed]] should be [Symbol Not Transcribed]1 (f.3).",
author = "Tarja Laitinen",
year = "1999",
language = "English",
volume = "100",
pages = "47--50",
journal = "Pulp and Paper Canada",
issn = "0316-4004",
publisher = "Business Information Group",
number = "4",

}

Field testing of stainless steels in paper machine environment. / Laitinen, Tarja.

In: Pulp and Paper Canada, Vol. 100, No. 4, 1999, p. 47-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Field testing of stainless steels in paper machine environment

AU - Laitinen, Tarja

PY - 1999

Y1 - 1999

N2 - At the wet ends of paper machines and especially at splash zones, pitting and crevice corrosion of stainless steels caused by chloride (C[Symbol Not Transcribed]) and thiosulphate (S[Symbol Not Transcribed]O[Symbol Not Transcribed]) ions is a common phenomenon. Chloride ions originate from wood floated in sea water, supplied water and chemicals added to the pulp mix. Mechanical pulp brightened with dithionite (S[Symbol Not Transcribed]O[Symbol Not Transcribed]) is the main source of thiosulphate ions (f.1). Thiosulphate pitting is known to occur within a narrow voltage potential range (f.2) and molar ratio [Equation Not Transcribed] (f.3). The most sensitive region for thiosulphate pitting is in the potential range of 0 to -400 mV[Symbol Not Transcribed] (f.4) and molar ratios of 10 to 30 (f.3). To initiate thiosulphate pitting corrosion on type 316L stainless steel the molar ratio [C[Symbol Not Transcribed]]/[SO[Symbol Not Transcribed]] should be [Symbol Not Transcribed]1 (f.3).

AB - At the wet ends of paper machines and especially at splash zones, pitting and crevice corrosion of stainless steels caused by chloride (C[Symbol Not Transcribed]) and thiosulphate (S[Symbol Not Transcribed]O[Symbol Not Transcribed]) ions is a common phenomenon. Chloride ions originate from wood floated in sea water, supplied water and chemicals added to the pulp mix. Mechanical pulp brightened with dithionite (S[Symbol Not Transcribed]O[Symbol Not Transcribed]) is the main source of thiosulphate ions (f.1). Thiosulphate pitting is known to occur within a narrow voltage potential range (f.2) and molar ratio [Equation Not Transcribed] (f.3). The most sensitive region for thiosulphate pitting is in the potential range of 0 to -400 mV[Symbol Not Transcribed] (f.4) and molar ratios of 10 to 30 (f.3). To initiate thiosulphate pitting corrosion on type 316L stainless steel the molar ratio [C[Symbol Not Transcribed]]/[SO[Symbol Not Transcribed]] should be [Symbol Not Transcribed]1 (f.3).

M3 - Article

VL - 100

SP - 47

EP - 50

JO - Pulp and Paper Canada

JF - Pulp and Paper Canada

SN - 0316-4004

IS - 4

ER -