Friction and wear properties in dry, water- and oil-lubricated DLC against alumina and DLC against steel contacts

Helena Ronkainen, Simo Varjus, Kenneth Holmberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

182 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films can be divided into two major categories according to their hydrogen content.
These categories have similarities in tribological performance, but the films also behave in a different manner in different tribological conditions.
The results of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films (a-C:H) and hydrogen-free hard carbon films (a-C) are reported in this study. The a-C:H films were deposited using the radio frequency (rf) plasma technique, and the hydrogen-free hard carbon films using pulsed vacuum arc.
The coatings were characterized and investigated with respect to their tribological performance in dry (50% RH), water-lubricated and oil-lubricated slow sliding conditions (0.004 m s−1). The a-C and a-C:H films had a low friction coefficient in dry sliding conditions (0.15 to 0.22), which was further decreased by 10–40% under boundary lubrication.
The a-C:H(Ti) films exhibited good self-lubricating properties (0.10) in dry sliding conditions and the a-C films had the lowest friction coefficient in water- (0.03) and oil-lubricated (0.08) conditions.
The hydrogen-free hard carbon films showed excellent wear resistance in dry, water- and oil-lubricated conditions, but hydrogenated a-C:H films suffered from severe wear in aqueous conditions.
The performance of a-C:H films could be improved by titanium alloying. In dry sliding conditions, the tribolayer formation of DLC films influenced the friction and wear performance, but in oil-lubricated conditions boundary lubrication layers were formed, which governed the tribological mechanisms in the contact.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)120-128
JournalWear
Volume222
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1998
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

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Diamond
Aluminum Oxide
carbon steels
Carbon steel
Diamonds
Oils
Alumina
friction
Carbon
aluminum oxides
oils
diamonds
Wear of materials
Friction
Carbon films
Water
carbon
Hydrogen
water
Diamond like carbon films

Cite this

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title = "Friction and wear properties in dry, water- and oil-lubricated DLC against alumina and DLC against steel contacts",
abstract = "Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films can be divided into two major categories according to their hydrogen content. These categories have similarities in tribological performance, but the films also behave in a different manner in different tribological conditions. The results of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films (a-C:H) and hydrogen-free hard carbon films (a-C) are reported in this study. The a-C:H films were deposited using the radio frequency (rf) plasma technique, and the hydrogen-free hard carbon films using pulsed vacuum arc. The coatings were characterized and investigated with respect to their tribological performance in dry (50{\%} RH), water-lubricated and oil-lubricated slow sliding conditions (0.004 m s−1). The a-C and a-C:H films had a low friction coefficient in dry sliding conditions (0.15 to 0.22), which was further decreased by 10–40{\%} under boundary lubrication. The a-C:H(Ti) films exhibited good self-lubricating properties (0.10) in dry sliding conditions and the a-C films had the lowest friction coefficient in water- (0.03) and oil-lubricated (0.08) conditions. The hydrogen-free hard carbon films showed excellent wear resistance in dry, water- and oil-lubricated conditions, but hydrogenated a-C:H films suffered from severe wear in aqueous conditions. The performance of a-C:H films could be improved by titanium alloying. In dry sliding conditions, the tribolayer formation of DLC films influenced the friction and wear performance, but in oil-lubricated conditions boundary lubrication layers were formed, which governed the tribological mechanisms in the contact.",
author = "Helena Ronkainen and Simo Varjus and Kenneth Holmberg",
year = "1998",
doi = "10.1016/S0043-1648(98)00314-7",
language = "English",
volume = "222",
pages = "120--128",
journal = "Wear",
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Friction and wear properties in dry, water- and oil-lubricated DLC against alumina and DLC against steel contacts. / Ronkainen, Helena; Varjus, Simo; Holmberg, Kenneth.

In: Wear, Vol. 222, No. 2, 1998, p. 120-128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Friction and wear properties in dry, water- and oil-lubricated DLC against alumina and DLC against steel contacts

AU - Ronkainen, Helena

AU - Varjus, Simo

AU - Holmberg, Kenneth

PY - 1998

Y1 - 1998

N2 - Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films can be divided into two major categories according to their hydrogen content. These categories have similarities in tribological performance, but the films also behave in a different manner in different tribological conditions. The results of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films (a-C:H) and hydrogen-free hard carbon films (a-C) are reported in this study. The a-C:H films were deposited using the radio frequency (rf) plasma technique, and the hydrogen-free hard carbon films using pulsed vacuum arc. The coatings were characterized and investigated with respect to their tribological performance in dry (50% RH), water-lubricated and oil-lubricated slow sliding conditions (0.004 m s−1). The a-C and a-C:H films had a low friction coefficient in dry sliding conditions (0.15 to 0.22), which was further decreased by 10–40% under boundary lubrication. The a-C:H(Ti) films exhibited good self-lubricating properties (0.10) in dry sliding conditions and the a-C films had the lowest friction coefficient in water- (0.03) and oil-lubricated (0.08) conditions. The hydrogen-free hard carbon films showed excellent wear resistance in dry, water- and oil-lubricated conditions, but hydrogenated a-C:H films suffered from severe wear in aqueous conditions. The performance of a-C:H films could be improved by titanium alloying. In dry sliding conditions, the tribolayer formation of DLC films influenced the friction and wear performance, but in oil-lubricated conditions boundary lubrication layers were formed, which governed the tribological mechanisms in the contact.

AB - Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films can be divided into two major categories according to their hydrogen content. These categories have similarities in tribological performance, but the films also behave in a different manner in different tribological conditions. The results of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films (a-C:H) and hydrogen-free hard carbon films (a-C) are reported in this study. The a-C:H films were deposited using the radio frequency (rf) plasma technique, and the hydrogen-free hard carbon films using pulsed vacuum arc. The coatings were characterized and investigated with respect to their tribological performance in dry (50% RH), water-lubricated and oil-lubricated slow sliding conditions (0.004 m s−1). The a-C and a-C:H films had a low friction coefficient in dry sliding conditions (0.15 to 0.22), which was further decreased by 10–40% under boundary lubrication. The a-C:H(Ti) films exhibited good self-lubricating properties (0.10) in dry sliding conditions and the a-C films had the lowest friction coefficient in water- (0.03) and oil-lubricated (0.08) conditions. The hydrogen-free hard carbon films showed excellent wear resistance in dry, water- and oil-lubricated conditions, but hydrogenated a-C:H films suffered from severe wear in aqueous conditions. The performance of a-C:H films could be improved by titanium alloying. In dry sliding conditions, the tribolayer formation of DLC films influenced the friction and wear performance, but in oil-lubricated conditions boundary lubrication layers were formed, which governed the tribological mechanisms in the contact.

U2 - 10.1016/S0043-1648(98)00314-7

DO - 10.1016/S0043-1648(98)00314-7

M3 - Article

VL - 222

SP - 120

EP - 128

JO - Wear

JF - Wear

SN - 0043-1648

IS - 2

ER -