Fulfilment of Net-Zero Energy Building (NZEB) with four metrics in a single family house with different heating alternatives

Ayman Mohamed (Corresponding Author), Ala Hasan, Kai Sirén

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    92 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This study aims to investigate the fulfillment of four Net Zero Energy Building (NZEB) balances, NZEB-PE, NZEB-site, NZEB-emission and NZEB-cost, considering the four metrics of primary energy (PE), site energy, CO2-eqemissions and energy cost, respectively, using weighting factors based on Finnish and international reference data. The study analyzes five conventional energy systems and seven biomass-based standalone and shared combined heat and power (CHP) systems. These systems are connected to a single family house located in Helsinki, Finland, with two energy efficiency levels: a standard house and a passive house, simulated by Trnsys software. The annual balance of the import and export of the operational thermal and electrical energies is applied. The simulated results indicate that the NZEB-emission, NZEB-PE, NZEB-cost, and NZEB-site are arranged in that order according to the ease of fulfilling the annual balance. Making the house high in thermal energy efficiency (or adding solar thermal collectors) for all the studied systems is a step towards achieving NZEB-PE, NZEB-cost, and NZEB-site. On the contrary, achieving the NZEB-emission by the shared CHPs connected to the standard house is easier than the passive house. The NZEB balance is more attainable by the shared CHPs than the standalone CHPs. The NZEB-PE is easier to achieve using the international factors than using the Finnish PE factors
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)385-399
    JournalApplied Energy
    Volume114
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014
    MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

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    heating
    Heating
    energy
    Energy efficiency
    Costs
    Thermal energy
    family
    Biomass
    energy efficiency
    cost
    Hot Temperature
    combined heat and power
    import

    Keywords

    • Net Zero Energy Buildings (NZEB)
    • primary energy
    • CO2-eq emissions
    • Micro and small-scale combined heat and power (micro and small CHP)
    • biomass

    Cite this

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    title = "Fulfilment of Net-Zero Energy Building (NZEB) with four metrics in a single family house with different heating alternatives",
    abstract = "This study aims to investigate the fulfillment of four Net Zero Energy Building (NZEB) balances, NZEB-PE, NZEB-site, NZEB-emission and NZEB-cost, considering the four metrics of primary energy (PE), site energy, CO2-eqemissions and energy cost, respectively, using weighting factors based on Finnish and international reference data. The study analyzes five conventional energy systems and seven biomass-based standalone and shared combined heat and power (CHP) systems. These systems are connected to a single family house located in Helsinki, Finland, with two energy efficiency levels: a standard house and a passive house, simulated by Trnsys software. The annual balance of the import and export of the operational thermal and electrical energies is applied. The simulated results indicate that the NZEB-emission, NZEB-PE, NZEB-cost, and NZEB-site are arranged in that order according to the ease of fulfilling the annual balance. Making the house high in thermal energy efficiency (or adding solar thermal collectors) for all the studied systems is a step towards achieving NZEB-PE, NZEB-cost, and NZEB-site. On the contrary, achieving the NZEB-emission by the shared CHPs connected to the standard house is easier than the passive house. The NZEB balance is more attainable by the shared CHPs than the standalone CHPs. The NZEB-PE is easier to achieve using the international factors than using the Finnish PE factors",
    keywords = "Net Zero Energy Buildings (NZEB), primary energy, CO2-eq emissions, Micro and small-scale combined heat and power (micro and small CHP), biomass",
    author = "Ayman Mohamed and Ala Hasan and Kai Sir{\'e}n",
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    doi = "10.1016/j.apenergy.2013.09.065",
    language = "English",
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    Fulfilment of Net-Zero Energy Building (NZEB) with four metrics in a single family house with different heating alternatives. / Mohamed, Ayman (Corresponding Author); Hasan, Ala; Sirén, Kai.

    In: Applied Energy, Vol. 114, 2014, p. 385-399.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Fulfilment of Net-Zero Energy Building (NZEB) with four metrics in a single family house with different heating alternatives

    AU - Mohamed, Ayman

    AU - Hasan, Ala

    AU - Sirén, Kai

    N1 - Project code: 82593 - SA_OPTIENERGY

    PY - 2014

    Y1 - 2014

    N2 - This study aims to investigate the fulfillment of four Net Zero Energy Building (NZEB) balances, NZEB-PE, NZEB-site, NZEB-emission and NZEB-cost, considering the four metrics of primary energy (PE), site energy, CO2-eqemissions and energy cost, respectively, using weighting factors based on Finnish and international reference data. The study analyzes five conventional energy systems and seven biomass-based standalone and shared combined heat and power (CHP) systems. These systems are connected to a single family house located in Helsinki, Finland, with two energy efficiency levels: a standard house and a passive house, simulated by Trnsys software. The annual balance of the import and export of the operational thermal and electrical energies is applied. The simulated results indicate that the NZEB-emission, NZEB-PE, NZEB-cost, and NZEB-site are arranged in that order according to the ease of fulfilling the annual balance. Making the house high in thermal energy efficiency (or adding solar thermal collectors) for all the studied systems is a step towards achieving NZEB-PE, NZEB-cost, and NZEB-site. On the contrary, achieving the NZEB-emission by the shared CHPs connected to the standard house is easier than the passive house. The NZEB balance is more attainable by the shared CHPs than the standalone CHPs. The NZEB-PE is easier to achieve using the international factors than using the Finnish PE factors

    AB - This study aims to investigate the fulfillment of four Net Zero Energy Building (NZEB) balances, NZEB-PE, NZEB-site, NZEB-emission and NZEB-cost, considering the four metrics of primary energy (PE), site energy, CO2-eqemissions and energy cost, respectively, using weighting factors based on Finnish and international reference data. The study analyzes five conventional energy systems and seven biomass-based standalone and shared combined heat and power (CHP) systems. These systems are connected to a single family house located in Helsinki, Finland, with two energy efficiency levels: a standard house and a passive house, simulated by Trnsys software. The annual balance of the import and export of the operational thermal and electrical energies is applied. The simulated results indicate that the NZEB-emission, NZEB-PE, NZEB-cost, and NZEB-site are arranged in that order according to the ease of fulfilling the annual balance. Making the house high in thermal energy efficiency (or adding solar thermal collectors) for all the studied systems is a step towards achieving NZEB-PE, NZEB-cost, and NZEB-site. On the contrary, achieving the NZEB-emission by the shared CHPs connected to the standard house is easier than the passive house. The NZEB balance is more attainable by the shared CHPs than the standalone CHPs. The NZEB-PE is easier to achieve using the international factors than using the Finnish PE factors

    KW - Net Zero Energy Buildings (NZEB)

    KW - primary energy

    KW - CO2-eq emissions

    KW - Micro and small-scale combined heat and power (micro and small CHP)

    KW - biomass

    U2 - 10.1016/j.apenergy.2013.09.065

    DO - 10.1016/j.apenergy.2013.09.065

    M3 - Article

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    EP - 399

    JO - Applied Energy

    JF - Applied Energy

    SN - 0306-2619

    ER -