Future magazine service

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter or book articleProfessional

    Abstract

    There are many simultaneous forces shaping magazine markets and changing the core business logic applied. On one hand, we are experiencing media convergence, wherein the traditional media industry is becoming integrated with the telecommunications industry and information technology. This is shaping consumers' media-use habits and opening the markets to new competitors. At the same time, the advertising markets react to the changing economic climate and increasing amount of online media content. As a consequence of all of this, the power is shifting from media companies to people. Consumers have an ever increasing selection of content that they can consume when and where they want. In his report on the changing media market, Snellman [1] states that the media industry has shifted from scarcity to an era of abundance where the supply of content is concerned. Thanks to the Internet, television content, radio programmes, music, and games are widely available. This challenges the traditional media-business models built on scarcity and permanently alters the market set-up. The vast majority of media revenue still is grounded in traditional businesses, such as subscriptions to printed newspapers and magazines, and advertising revenue [2, 3]. However, growing impact of the Internet seems inevitable. According to Snellman [1], we probably have seen only the beginning of a major change in communications services, with the most significant changes being yet to come. The field of competition, consumer trends, and technology are driving the continuous development of communication services toward more and more individualised service experiences, and the new services will take advantage of diverse new possibilities, such as large masses of data, positioning, and large variety in sensors.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationHighlights in service research
    Place of PublicationEspoo
    PublisherVTT Technical Research Centre of Finland
    Pages109-113
    ISBN (Electronic)978-951-38-7969-3
    ISBN (Print)978-951-38-7968-6
    Publication statusPublished - 2013
    MoE publication typeNot Eligible

    Publication series

    SeriesVTT Research Highlights
    Number6
    ISSN2242-1173

    Fingerprint

    Industry
    Marketing
    Internet
    Computer music
    Telecommunication industry
    Communication
    Television
    Information technology
    Economics
    Sensors

    Cite this

    Seisto, A. (2013). Future magazine service. In Highlights in service research (pp. 109-113). Espoo: VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. VTT Research Highlights, No. 6
    Seisto, Anu. / Future magazine service. Highlights in service research. Espoo : VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, 2013. pp. 109-113 (VTT Research Highlights; No. 6).
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    Seisto, A 2013, Future magazine service. in Highlights in service research. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, VTT Research Highlights, no. 6, pp. 109-113.

    Future magazine service. / Seisto, Anu.

    Highlights in service research. Espoo : VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, 2013. p. 109-113 (VTT Research Highlights; No. 6).

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter or book articleProfessional

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    Seisto A. Future magazine service. In Highlights in service research. Espoo: VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. 2013. p. 109-113. (VTT Research Highlights; No. 6).