GHG emission balances and prospects of hydrogen enhanced synthetic biofuels from solid biomass in the European context

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The European Commission has proposed a minimum share of 3.6% for advanced biofuels in transport in 2030. Satisfying this target using synthetic biofuels would require 48-62 Mt/a of forest residue feedstock. If all biofuel plants were maximally enhanced with additional hydrogen input, the biomass demand would be reduced by 35 Mt to 16-24 Mt/a. As sustainable biomass is a limited resource, such drastic improvements in the efficiency of biomass use have a favourable impact on biomass availability. In this work we assume electrolysis of water as the source of hydrogen and investigate the GHG emission balances of hydrogen enhanced biofuels using the calculation method provided in the European Union's sustainability criteria for biofuels. The required 70% emission saving compared to fossil fuels is achieved when the carbon intensity of electricity remains under 84-110 gCO2/kWh, depending on the process configuration. In addition, we study the possibility that an emission factor could be allocated to the wood biomass, referring to recent discussions on climate impacts of forest bioenergy. Without hydrogen enhancement, the emission factor needs to remain below 13 gCO2/MJwood to meet the 70% requirement, while for hydrogen-enhanced configurations it could increase to 36 gCO2/MJwood, under the assumption of zero emission electricity.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)106-118
Number of pages13
JournalApplied Energy
Volume200
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fingerprint

Biofuels
biofuel
Biomass
hydrogen
Hydrogen
biomass
electricity
Electricity
climate effect
bioenergy
European Commission
Fossil fuels
Electrolysis
Feedstocks
fossil fuel
Sustainable development
European Union
electrokinesis
Wood
sustainability

Keywords

  • synthetic biofuels
  • hydrogen enhancement
  • carbon efficiency
  • sustainability
  • power-to-fuels
  • RED2

Cite this

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title = "GHG emission balances and prospects of hydrogen enhanced synthetic biofuels from solid biomass in the European context",
abstract = "The European Commission has proposed a minimum share of 3.6{\%} for advanced biofuels in transport in 2030. Satisfying this target using synthetic biofuels would require 48-62 Mt/a of forest residue feedstock. If all biofuel plants were maximally enhanced with additional hydrogen input, the biomass demand would be reduced by 35 Mt to 16-24 Mt/a. As sustainable biomass is a limited resource, such drastic improvements in the efficiency of biomass use have a favourable impact on biomass availability. In this work we assume electrolysis of water as the source of hydrogen and investigate the GHG emission balances of hydrogen enhanced biofuels using the calculation method provided in the European Union's sustainability criteria for biofuels. The required 70{\%} emission saving compared to fossil fuels is achieved when the carbon intensity of electricity remains under 84-110 gCO2/kWh, depending on the process configuration. In addition, we study the possibility that an emission factor could be allocated to the wood biomass, referring to recent discussions on climate impacts of forest bioenergy. Without hydrogen enhancement, the emission factor needs to remain below 13 gCO2/MJwood to meet the 70{\%} requirement, while for hydrogen-enhanced configurations it could increase to 36 gCO2/MJwood, under the assumption of zero emission electricity.",
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GHG emission balances and prospects of hydrogen enhanced synthetic biofuels from solid biomass in the European context. / Koponen, Kati; Hannula, Ilkka.

In: Applied Energy, Vol. 200, 01.01.2017, p. 106-118.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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