Greenhouse gases embodied in the international trade and final consumption of Finland: An input-output analysis

Ilmo Mäenpää, H. Siikavirta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

78 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The estimation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with international trade and final consumption gives a more complete and balanced picture of the responsibilities of various countries for the emissions that cause the climate change. The aim of this study was to look at the impact of the coverage of the GHGs and their sources and assumptions regarding the emissions of imports on the results of GHG emissions associated with international trade and final consumption of Finland. In addition to a single year study, a trend covering years 1990–2003 was produced for Finland to study the development of the GHG emissions associated with domestic consumption and the reasons behind the development. According to our results Finland was in 1999 a net exporter of CO2 from fossil fuel combustion, CO2 from all sources and GHGs of 4(4.2), 5 or 7 Gkg, respectively. The impact of different assumptions concerning the emissions embodied in imports in the case of Finland was tested by using the domestic emission intensities and the ratios of embodied emissions in imports in relation to domestic products by utilizing the data from the study by (OECD, 2003b. Carbon Dioxide Emissions Embodied in International Trade of Goods, STI Working Paper 2003/15, OECD, Paris). In the case of Finland, the differences of results calculated with these two methods remained rather small. The total emissions embodied in the imports changed from 33.8 to 34.4 Gkg and consequently the net export of CO2 from fossil fuel combustion changed from 4.2 to 3.6 Gkg. The results for 1990–2003 show that the GHG emissions embodied in the exports have exceeded the GHG emissions embodied in the imports from early 1990s. The reason for the increasingly positive GHG trade balance in the case of Finland has been the change in the magnitude of trade rather than the changes in its structure. The results show also that the impact of international transport on the emission intensity of imports is significant and merits further research.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)128-143
JournalEnergy Policy
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fingerprint

input-output analysis
International trade
international trade
Greenhouse gases
Gas emissions
greenhouse gas
import
Fossil fuels
Climate change
OECD
consumption
fossil fuel
Carbon dioxide
gas trade
combustion

Cite this

@article{7f529291ff954e43aac8e44483f323a2,
title = "Greenhouse gases embodied in the international trade and final consumption of Finland: An input-output analysis",
abstract = "The estimation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with international trade and final consumption gives a more complete and balanced picture of the responsibilities of various countries for the emissions that cause the climate change. The aim of this study was to look at the impact of the coverage of the GHGs and their sources and assumptions regarding the emissions of imports on the results of GHG emissions associated with international trade and final consumption of Finland. In addition to a single year study, a trend covering years 1990–2003 was produced for Finland to study the development of the GHG emissions associated with domestic consumption and the reasons behind the development. According to our results Finland was in 1999 a net exporter of CO2 from fossil fuel combustion, CO2 from all sources and GHGs of 4(4.2), 5 or 7 Gkg, respectively. The impact of different assumptions concerning the emissions embodied in imports in the case of Finland was tested by using the domestic emission intensities and the ratios of embodied emissions in imports in relation to domestic products by utilizing the data from the study by (OECD, 2003b. Carbon Dioxide Emissions Embodied in International Trade of Goods, STI Working Paper 2003/15, OECD, Paris). In the case of Finland, the differences of results calculated with these two methods remained rather small. The total emissions embodied in the imports changed from 33.8 to 34.4 Gkg and consequently the net export of CO2 from fossil fuel combustion changed from 4.2 to 3.6 Gkg. The results for 1990–2003 show that the GHG emissions embodied in the exports have exceeded the GHG emissions embodied in the imports from early 1990s. The reason for the increasingly positive GHG trade balance in the case of Finland has been the change in the magnitude of trade rather than the changes in its structure. The results show also that the impact of international transport on the emission intensity of imports is significant and merits further research.",
author = "Ilmo M{\"a}enp{\"a}{\"a} and H. Siikavirta",
year = "2007",
doi = "10.1016/j.enpol.2005.10.006",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "128--143",
journal = "Energy Policy",
issn = "0301-4215",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "1",

}

Greenhouse gases embodied in the international trade and final consumption of Finland : An input-output analysis. / Mäenpää, Ilmo; Siikavirta, H.

In: Energy Policy, Vol. 35, No. 1, 2007, p. 128-143.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Greenhouse gases embodied in the international trade and final consumption of Finland

T2 - An input-output analysis

AU - Mäenpää, Ilmo

AU - Siikavirta, H.

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - The estimation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with international trade and final consumption gives a more complete and balanced picture of the responsibilities of various countries for the emissions that cause the climate change. The aim of this study was to look at the impact of the coverage of the GHGs and their sources and assumptions regarding the emissions of imports on the results of GHG emissions associated with international trade and final consumption of Finland. In addition to a single year study, a trend covering years 1990–2003 was produced for Finland to study the development of the GHG emissions associated with domestic consumption and the reasons behind the development. According to our results Finland was in 1999 a net exporter of CO2 from fossil fuel combustion, CO2 from all sources and GHGs of 4(4.2), 5 or 7 Gkg, respectively. The impact of different assumptions concerning the emissions embodied in imports in the case of Finland was tested by using the domestic emission intensities and the ratios of embodied emissions in imports in relation to domestic products by utilizing the data from the study by (OECD, 2003b. Carbon Dioxide Emissions Embodied in International Trade of Goods, STI Working Paper 2003/15, OECD, Paris). In the case of Finland, the differences of results calculated with these two methods remained rather small. The total emissions embodied in the imports changed from 33.8 to 34.4 Gkg and consequently the net export of CO2 from fossil fuel combustion changed from 4.2 to 3.6 Gkg. The results for 1990–2003 show that the GHG emissions embodied in the exports have exceeded the GHG emissions embodied in the imports from early 1990s. The reason for the increasingly positive GHG trade balance in the case of Finland has been the change in the magnitude of trade rather than the changes in its structure. The results show also that the impact of international transport on the emission intensity of imports is significant and merits further research.

AB - The estimation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with international trade and final consumption gives a more complete and balanced picture of the responsibilities of various countries for the emissions that cause the climate change. The aim of this study was to look at the impact of the coverage of the GHGs and their sources and assumptions regarding the emissions of imports on the results of GHG emissions associated with international trade and final consumption of Finland. In addition to a single year study, a trend covering years 1990–2003 was produced for Finland to study the development of the GHG emissions associated with domestic consumption and the reasons behind the development. According to our results Finland was in 1999 a net exporter of CO2 from fossil fuel combustion, CO2 from all sources and GHGs of 4(4.2), 5 or 7 Gkg, respectively. The impact of different assumptions concerning the emissions embodied in imports in the case of Finland was tested by using the domestic emission intensities and the ratios of embodied emissions in imports in relation to domestic products by utilizing the data from the study by (OECD, 2003b. Carbon Dioxide Emissions Embodied in International Trade of Goods, STI Working Paper 2003/15, OECD, Paris). In the case of Finland, the differences of results calculated with these two methods remained rather small. The total emissions embodied in the imports changed from 33.8 to 34.4 Gkg and consequently the net export of CO2 from fossil fuel combustion changed from 4.2 to 3.6 Gkg. The results for 1990–2003 show that the GHG emissions embodied in the exports have exceeded the GHG emissions embodied in the imports from early 1990s. The reason for the increasingly positive GHG trade balance in the case of Finland has been the change in the magnitude of trade rather than the changes in its structure. The results show also that the impact of international transport on the emission intensity of imports is significant and merits further research.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-33750150208&partnerID=MN8TOARS

U2 - 10.1016/j.enpol.2005.10.006

DO - 10.1016/j.enpol.2005.10.006

M3 - Article

VL - 35

SP - 128

EP - 143

JO - Energy Policy

JF - Energy Policy

SN - 0301-4215

IS - 1

ER -