Fusarium species synthesize alkaline proteinases in infested barley

Anja Pekkarinen, Tuija Sarlin, Arja Laitila, Auli Haikara, Berne L. Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) that is infested with Fusarium head blight (FHB, ‘scab’) is unsuitable for malting and brewing because it may contain mycotoxins and has unacceptable malting quality. Fungal proteinases are apparently often involved in plant-microbe interactions, where they degrade storage proteins, but very little is known about the enzymes that the fungi produce in the infected grain. We have shown previously that one plant pathogenic fungus, Fusarium culmorum, produced subtilisin- and trypsin-like enzymes when grown in a cereal protein medium. To establish whether these proteinases were also synthesized in FHB-infested barley in vivo, field-grown barley was infested as the heads emerged. Extracts were prepared from the grain as it developed and matured and their proteolytic activities were measured with N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe p -nitroanilide and N-benzoyl-Val-Gly-Arg p -nitroanilide. The heavily infested barleys contained both subtilisin- and trypsin-like activities. These enzymes reacted with antibodies prepared against each of the two F. culmorum proteinases, indicating that those produced in the laboratory cultures and in the field-infested barley were the same. The presence of these proteinases correlated with the degradation of specific buffer-soluble proteins in the infested grains. These enzymes readily hydrolyzed barley grain storage proteins (C- and D-hordeins) in vitro. The presence of these Fusarium proteinases in the barley indicates that they probably play an important role in the infestation, but exactly how and when they function is not clear.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)349-356
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Cereal Science
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fingerprint

Fusarium
Hordeum
Peptide Hydrolases
proteinases
barley
Subtilisin
Enzymes
Fungi
grain protein
Trypsin
Fusarium culmorum
Brewing
subtilisin
Proteins
storage proteins
enzymes
Glutens
Mycotoxins
trypsin
Protein C

Keywords

  • Fusarium
  • scab
  • proteinases
  • barley
  • cereals

Cite this

Pekkarinen, Anja ; Sarlin, Tuija ; Laitila, Arja ; Haikara, Auli ; Jones, Berne L. / Fusarium species synthesize alkaline proteinases in infested barley. In: Journal of Cereal Science. 2003 ; Vol. 37, No. 3. pp. 349-356.
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abstract = "Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) that is infested with Fusarium head blight (FHB, ‘scab’) is unsuitable for malting and brewing because it may contain mycotoxins and has unacceptable malting quality. Fungal proteinases are apparently often involved in plant-microbe interactions, where they degrade storage proteins, but very little is known about the enzymes that the fungi produce in the infected grain. We have shown previously that one plant pathogenic fungus, Fusarium culmorum, produced subtilisin- and trypsin-like enzymes when grown in a cereal protein medium. To establish whether these proteinases were also synthesized in FHB-infested barley in vivo, field-grown barley was infested as the heads emerged. Extracts were prepared from the grain as it developed and matured and their proteolytic activities were measured with N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe p -nitroanilide and N-benzoyl-Val-Gly-Arg p -nitroanilide. The heavily infested barleys contained both subtilisin- and trypsin-like activities. These enzymes reacted with antibodies prepared against each of the two F. culmorum proteinases, indicating that those produced in the laboratory cultures and in the field-infested barley were the same. The presence of these proteinases correlated with the degradation of specific buffer-soluble proteins in the infested grains. These enzymes readily hydrolyzed barley grain storage proteins (C- and D-hordeins) in vitro. The presence of these Fusarium proteinases in the barley indicates that they probably play an important role in the infestation, but exactly how and when they function is not clear.",
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Fusarium species synthesize alkaline proteinases in infested barley. / Pekkarinen, Anja; Sarlin, Tuija; Laitila, Arja; Haikara, Auli; Jones, Berne L.

In: Journal of Cereal Science, Vol. 37, No. 3, 2003, p. 349-356.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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T1 - Fusarium species synthesize alkaline proteinases in infested barley

AU - Pekkarinen, Anja

AU - Sarlin, Tuija

AU - Laitila, Arja

AU - Haikara, Auli

AU - Jones, Berne L.

PY - 2003

Y1 - 2003

N2 - Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) that is infested with Fusarium head blight (FHB, ‘scab’) is unsuitable for malting and brewing because it may contain mycotoxins and has unacceptable malting quality. Fungal proteinases are apparently often involved in plant-microbe interactions, where they degrade storage proteins, but very little is known about the enzymes that the fungi produce in the infected grain. We have shown previously that one plant pathogenic fungus, Fusarium culmorum, produced subtilisin- and trypsin-like enzymes when grown in a cereal protein medium. To establish whether these proteinases were also synthesized in FHB-infested barley in vivo, field-grown barley was infested as the heads emerged. Extracts were prepared from the grain as it developed and matured and their proteolytic activities were measured with N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe p -nitroanilide and N-benzoyl-Val-Gly-Arg p -nitroanilide. The heavily infested barleys contained both subtilisin- and trypsin-like activities. These enzymes reacted with antibodies prepared against each of the two F. culmorum proteinases, indicating that those produced in the laboratory cultures and in the field-infested barley were the same. The presence of these proteinases correlated with the degradation of specific buffer-soluble proteins in the infested grains. These enzymes readily hydrolyzed barley grain storage proteins (C- and D-hordeins) in vitro. The presence of these Fusarium proteinases in the barley indicates that they probably play an important role in the infestation, but exactly how and when they function is not clear.

AB - Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) that is infested with Fusarium head blight (FHB, ‘scab’) is unsuitable for malting and brewing because it may contain mycotoxins and has unacceptable malting quality. Fungal proteinases are apparently often involved in plant-microbe interactions, where they degrade storage proteins, but very little is known about the enzymes that the fungi produce in the infected grain. We have shown previously that one plant pathogenic fungus, Fusarium culmorum, produced subtilisin- and trypsin-like enzymes when grown in a cereal protein medium. To establish whether these proteinases were also synthesized in FHB-infested barley in vivo, field-grown barley was infested as the heads emerged. Extracts were prepared from the grain as it developed and matured and their proteolytic activities were measured with N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe p -nitroanilide and N-benzoyl-Val-Gly-Arg p -nitroanilide. The heavily infested barleys contained both subtilisin- and trypsin-like activities. These enzymes reacted with antibodies prepared against each of the two F. culmorum proteinases, indicating that those produced in the laboratory cultures and in the field-infested barley were the same. The presence of these proteinases correlated with the degradation of specific buffer-soluble proteins in the infested grains. These enzymes readily hydrolyzed barley grain storage proteins (C- and D-hordeins) in vitro. The presence of these Fusarium proteinases in the barley indicates that they probably play an important role in the infestation, but exactly how and when they function is not clear.

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JO - Journal of Cereal Science

JF - Journal of Cereal Science

SN - 0733-5210

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