Indoor air problems in a healthcare centre

A case report of a follow-up

P. Aarnio, H. Mussalo-Rauhamaa, S. Mäkinen-Kiljunen, Kristina Saarela, S. Loft

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Indoor air problems present a considerable challenge for workplace personnel. Here, we report the follow-up results of employees in a healthcare centre in Southern Finland. In this building there was moisture damage, including moulds and other microbial growth, as well as associated indoor air problems, such as sporadic high ammonia concentrations, and there was suspicion of mites. The indoor air quality was determined through mould and volatile organic compound measurements. Symptoms were recorded on the MM-40-FIN questionnaire. Two employees were also examined at the Clinic for Indoor Air Health Problems, Helsinki University Central Hospital. Employees’ complaints about dustiness and stuffiness remained mostly unchanged during the 6 follow-up years. After several renovations of the building, the eye complaints diminished to about half. Two case reports showed disappearance of symptoms when their exposure ceased. However, the complexity of indoor air problems makes it difficult to improve the indoor climate and relieve symptoms with simple renovations. Sensitive or allergic individuals may more readily react than others to these moistureassociated problems.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)433 - 441
Number of pages9
JournalIndoor and Built Environment
Volume14
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Fingerprint

Air
Delivery of Health Care
Fungi
Indoor Air Pollution
Volatile Organic Compounds
Mites
Finland
Climate
Ammonia
Workplace
Health
Growth

Cite this

Aarnio, P., Mussalo-Rauhamaa, H., Mäkinen-Kiljunen, S., Saarela, K., & Loft, S. (2005). Indoor air problems in a healthcare centre: A case report of a follow-up. Indoor and Built Environment, 14(5), 433 - 441. https://doi.org/10.1177/1420326X04050674
Aarnio, P. ; Mussalo-Rauhamaa, H. ; Mäkinen-Kiljunen, S. ; Saarela, Kristina ; Loft, S. / Indoor air problems in a healthcare centre : A case report of a follow-up. In: Indoor and Built Environment. 2005 ; Vol. 14, No. 5. pp. 433 - 441.
@article{31405694ea9b433db0006af19ea0cadf,
title = "Indoor air problems in a healthcare centre: A case report of a follow-up",
abstract = "Indoor air problems present a considerable challenge for workplace personnel. Here, we report the follow-up results of employees in a healthcare centre in Southern Finland. In this building there was moisture damage, including moulds and other microbial growth, as well as associated indoor air problems, such as sporadic high ammonia concentrations, and there was suspicion of mites. The indoor air quality was determined through mould and volatile organic compound measurements. Symptoms were recorded on the MM-40-FIN questionnaire. Two employees were also examined at the Clinic for Indoor Air Health Problems, Helsinki University Central Hospital. Employees’ complaints about dustiness and stuffiness remained mostly unchanged during the 6 follow-up years. After several renovations of the building, the eye complaints diminished to about half. Two case reports showed disappearance of symptoms when their exposure ceased. However, the complexity of indoor air problems makes it difficult to improve the indoor climate and relieve symptoms with simple renovations. Sensitive or allergic individuals may more readily react than others to these moistureassociated problems.",
author = "P. Aarnio and H. Mussalo-Rauhamaa and S. M{\"a}kinen-Kiljunen and Kristina Saarela and S. Loft",
year = "2005",
doi = "10.1177/1420326X04050674",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "433 -- 441",
journal = "Indoor and Built Environment",
issn = "1420-326X",
publisher = "SAGE Publications",
number = "5",

}

Aarnio, P, Mussalo-Rauhamaa, H, Mäkinen-Kiljunen, S, Saarela, K & Loft, S 2005, 'Indoor air problems in a healthcare centre: A case report of a follow-up', Indoor and Built Environment, vol. 14, no. 5, pp. 433 - 441. https://doi.org/10.1177/1420326X04050674

Indoor air problems in a healthcare centre : A case report of a follow-up. / Aarnio, P.; Mussalo-Rauhamaa, H.; Mäkinen-Kiljunen, S.; Saarela, Kristina; Loft, S.

In: Indoor and Built Environment, Vol. 14, No. 5, 2005, p. 433 - 441.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Indoor air problems in a healthcare centre

T2 - A case report of a follow-up

AU - Aarnio, P.

AU - Mussalo-Rauhamaa, H.

AU - Mäkinen-Kiljunen, S.

AU - Saarela, Kristina

AU - Loft, S.

PY - 2005

Y1 - 2005

N2 - Indoor air problems present a considerable challenge for workplace personnel. Here, we report the follow-up results of employees in a healthcare centre in Southern Finland. In this building there was moisture damage, including moulds and other microbial growth, as well as associated indoor air problems, such as sporadic high ammonia concentrations, and there was suspicion of mites. The indoor air quality was determined through mould and volatile organic compound measurements. Symptoms were recorded on the MM-40-FIN questionnaire. Two employees were also examined at the Clinic for Indoor Air Health Problems, Helsinki University Central Hospital. Employees’ complaints about dustiness and stuffiness remained mostly unchanged during the 6 follow-up years. After several renovations of the building, the eye complaints diminished to about half. Two case reports showed disappearance of symptoms when their exposure ceased. However, the complexity of indoor air problems makes it difficult to improve the indoor climate and relieve symptoms with simple renovations. Sensitive or allergic individuals may more readily react than others to these moistureassociated problems.

AB - Indoor air problems present a considerable challenge for workplace personnel. Here, we report the follow-up results of employees in a healthcare centre in Southern Finland. In this building there was moisture damage, including moulds and other microbial growth, as well as associated indoor air problems, such as sporadic high ammonia concentrations, and there was suspicion of mites. The indoor air quality was determined through mould and volatile organic compound measurements. Symptoms were recorded on the MM-40-FIN questionnaire. Two employees were also examined at the Clinic for Indoor Air Health Problems, Helsinki University Central Hospital. Employees’ complaints about dustiness and stuffiness remained mostly unchanged during the 6 follow-up years. After several renovations of the building, the eye complaints diminished to about half. Two case reports showed disappearance of symptoms when their exposure ceased. However, the complexity of indoor air problems makes it difficult to improve the indoor climate and relieve symptoms with simple renovations. Sensitive or allergic individuals may more readily react than others to these moistureassociated problems.

U2 - 10.1177/1420326X04050674

DO - 10.1177/1420326X04050674

M3 - Article

VL - 14

SP - 433

EP - 441

JO - Indoor and Built Environment

JF - Indoor and Built Environment

SN - 1420-326X

IS - 5

ER -

Aarnio P, Mussalo-Rauhamaa H, Mäkinen-Kiljunen S, Saarela K, Loft S. Indoor air problems in a healthcare centre: A case report of a follow-up. Indoor and Built Environment. 2005;14(5):433 - 441. https://doi.org/10.1177/1420326X04050674