Intelligent transport systems and effects on road traffic accidents; state of the art

Truls Vaa, Merja Penttinen, Ioanna Spyropolou

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    87 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The results from several reviews have been presented and the aspects of road safety associated with intelligent transport systems (ITS) applications have been addressed. The attempt is to make a state-of-the-art regarding effects on accidents by categorising systems according to levels of evaluations methods that have been applied. These categories are effects on behaviour, effects on accidents by proxy/surrogate methods, accident studies from real traffic, effects on accident types and finally by meta-analysis where weighted estimates of effects on accidents can be calculated. Thirty-three IT systems including driver assistance systems/advanced driver assistance systems, in-vehicle information systems, in-vehicle data-collection systems and road telematics have been listed. Effects based on meta-analysis are estimated for 11 systems, and single accident studies are found for an additional 2 systems. For the remaining 20 systems, no studies from real road traffic have been identified. Effects on accidents of antilocking brake systems and electronic stability control (ESC) are presented in more detail according to their effects on certain accident types. ESC appears to be very efficient in reducing the number of accidents. Behavioural adaptations to ITS are considered and discussed, especially in terms of compensation mechanisms. Four hypotheses regarding prediction of effects on accidents are stated according to whether systems increase or decrease 'windows of opportunities' by calling upon a driver behaviour model where emotions play a central role.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)81-88
    JournalIET Intelligent Transport Systems
    Volume1
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2007
    MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed
    Event13th World Congress and Exhibition on Intelligent Transport Systems and Services - London, United Kingdom
    Duration: 8 Oct 200612 Oct 2006

    Fingerprint

    Highway accidents
    traffic accident
    road traffic
    transport system
    accident
    Accidents
    driver
    meta-analysis
    surrogate method
    assistance
    effect
    state of the art
    electronics
    road
    Advanced driver assistance systems
    telematics
    behavior model
    Brakes
    information system
    Information systems

    Keywords

    • ITS
    • effect
    • road traffic
    • safety
    • accident
    • behavioural adaptation
    • HUMANIST

    Cite this

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    abstract = "The results from several reviews have been presented and the aspects of road safety associated with intelligent transport systems (ITS) applications have been addressed. The attempt is to make a state-of-the-art regarding effects on accidents by categorising systems according to levels of evaluations methods that have been applied. These categories are effects on behaviour, effects on accidents by proxy/surrogate methods, accident studies from real traffic, effects on accident types and finally by meta-analysis where weighted estimates of effects on accidents can be calculated. Thirty-three IT systems including driver assistance systems/advanced driver assistance systems, in-vehicle information systems, in-vehicle data-collection systems and road telematics have been listed. Effects based on meta-analysis are estimated for 11 systems, and single accident studies are found for an additional 2 systems. For the remaining 20 systems, no studies from real road traffic have been identified. Effects on accidents of antilocking brake systems and electronic stability control (ESC) are presented in more detail according to their effects on certain accident types. ESC appears to be very efficient in reducing the number of accidents. Behavioural adaptations to ITS are considered and discussed, especially in terms of compensation mechanisms. Four hypotheses regarding prediction of effects on accidents are stated according to whether systems increase or decrease 'windows of opportunities' by calling upon a driver behaviour model where emotions play a central role.",
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    Intelligent transport systems and effects on road traffic accidents; state of the art. / Vaa, Truls; Penttinen, Merja; Spyropolou, Ioanna.

    In: IET Intelligent Transport Systems, Vol. 1, No. 2, 2007, p. 81-88.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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